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#41 stealthfighter

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 01:13 AM

 

It should address the educational need of the Filipino nation.

 

That means ALL Filipinos.

 

Average intelligence???? Why would you invest people's hard-earned taxes on average-intellect students? You should invest on the above-average intelligent students who have the right attitude and perseverance.

 

Because the vast majority of poor Filipinos (and Filipinos in general) have a rather average level of intellectual capacity. How do I know? I was a teacher for 10 years and have witnessed the "the decline" in action. 

 

If you're going to invest on "above-average intelligent students,"  they only constitute a minority and many of them are unlikely to come from poor families anyway. Therefore, how does that "address the educational need of the Filipino nation. That means ALL Filipinos."


Edited by stealthfighter, 09 August 2017 - 01:21 AM.


#42 paddy

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 01:50 AM

If our government can enact a law requiring ALL parents to send their kids (from ages 4 up to 18) to school (public or private, depending on financial capabilities), will it improve our nation's intellect?  And if the government prioritizes the grassroots education (K1 to K12) by allotting most of the education budget to these sector, will it benefit Filipinos more?  And if whatever budget is left be given to the SUCs, will this be more fair in general?

 

I dream of young Aetas in the mountain provinces having their own school right in their community... giving them a fighting chance and the opportunity to get quality education and gain entry to some of our prestigious SUCs... :)



#43 camiar

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 10:17 AM

 

Because the vast majority of poor Filipinos (and Filipinos in general) have a rather average level of intellectual capacity. How do I know? I was a teacher for 10 years and have witnessed the "the decline" in action. 

 

If you're going to invest on "above-average intelligent students,"  they only constitute a minority and many of them are unlikely to come from poor families anyway. Therefore, how does that "address the educational need of the Filipino nation. That means ALL Filipinos."

It benefits all Filipinos if we wisely invest on Filipino students who have the qualifications to give the best return on our investment, instead of wasting them on a lot of average students who don't really care if they learn something or not.



#44 camiar

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 10:21 AM

1.  give to deserving SUC students regardless of social strata.

2.  students should pass a very stringent entrance examination.

3.  they should have maintaining grades.

4.  length of college schooling = length of government service after they graduate.

 

I agree.



#45 Gwen Morales

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 03:15 PM

 
 
I have known super rich families sending their children to SUCs to study.  They have passed the exams and hence they are qualified by law and avail free tuition.


Super rich families nowadays dont send their children in Philippine universities whether SUC or Private.

They send their children abroad.

Yan ay kung pag uusapan naten ay Super Rich. Ganern na ngayon.

#46 stealthfighter

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 11:57 PM

It benefits all Filipinos if we wisely invest on Filipino students who have the qualifications to give the best return on our investment, instead of wasting them on a lot of average students who don't really care if they learn something or not.

 

The problem here is simple math. As I have mentioned, only a minority of Filipino students "have the qualifications to give the best return on our investment." The remaining majority are comprised of either students who are not bad but just don't have an exceptional intellectual capacity, or students who practically don't care about learning. If we are going to invest only on students who "have the qualifications to give the best return on our investment"  then it's not going to be any different from the current system we have right now which disproportionately benefits people who are already in the middle or high class of the society (where most though not all intelligent students tend to come from). 



#47 jacuzzi

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Posted 10 August 2017 - 03:06 AM

There is a huge confusion with the function of education in this country.  I believe that the administration needs to set the example to change that. Many indigent families send their kids to school in order to give them better opportunities and uplift their status from poverty. Keeping the youth off the streets and making sure that their lives are NOT WASTED are defined clearly by the president himself in his anti-drugs campaign.

 

This Drugs Campaign is commendable worldwide because of President Duterte's leadership in defining his reason that we are a poor country and children are the basic means to protect and uplift the basic family institution, which is at the core of his policy. The sooner these children attain productivity, the better for the country.

 

The poor show of street rally of young people at the SONA is a warning against productivity. Families do not send their children to school to make them street parliamentarians and revolutionaries who may eventually turn violent. The youth is void of experience and in this case, they lack common sense or simple feedback on the history of their political (Maoist) stance.

I mean China's modern progress is centred on accommodating industrial opportunity that demolished this Labor power structure. Yes, it was this Labor power block that destroyed sustainability of industrial factories in countries like the USA and the Philippines.  Filipinos do not have local jobs due to the unreasonable dictatorship of Labor which denies everybody opportunities. They were the reasons why many factories closed and the destruction of a lot of established industries.  This administration got industrial pledges for new factories but this cannot materialize under a condition of street unrest and Organized Labor resisting infusion of Capital in the guise of nationalism. These street activities are simply counterproductive to government effort.

 

In the meantime students in schools are confused as to the reason why they get an education. These students fail to see that they have an opportunity to move out of being stuck in a lifelong career as laborers. These students fail to see that their families are being pulled down into poverty and permanently cemented in a Labor status, under the power and influence of Union leaders who have been poor students and cannot establish any form of lucrative work outside socialism.



#48 baMbee🐝

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Posted 10 August 2017 - 06:31 AM

Free education is a right given that we're paying taxes
Budget is limited
Corruption sis another story
Limit it to those who deserve it

#49 daphne loves derby

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 11:22 AM

this is one of the many options:

 

Source funds for free tertiary education from 3 underperforming agencies – Nograles

http://news.mb.com.p...ncies-nograles/

 

Funding for free tertiary education should be sourced from three underperforming government agencies, House Appropriations Chairman and Davao City 1st District Rep. Karlo Nograles said Thursday.
 

 

REP.-KARLO-NOGRALES.jpg

Rep. Karlo Nograles
(MANILA BULLETIN)

 

Nograles identified the Departments of Information and Communications (DICT), of Transportation (DOTr), and of Agrarian Reform (DAR) as the agencies he believes can absorb the budget cuts for the sake of the implementation of Republic Act (RA) 10931, the “Universal Access to Quality Tertiary Education Act.”
 
He described the three government agencies as “low in absorptive capacity” and “sluggish in the enforcement of projects and programs.”
 
RA 10931 provides tuition-free education in 114 State Universities and Colleges (SUCs), 16 Local Universities and Colleges (LUCs) accredited by Commission on Higher Education (CHED) and 122 Technical-Vocational Institutions (TVIs) under the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA).

Nograles said that at least P37.5 billion worth of funds could be sourced from these three departments and act as a “standby fund” once the free college education program is fully implemented.
 
He noted that during the budget briefing of the DICT, he found out that the agency has P2.7 billion of unused appropriations in 2016 and another P2.695 billion in unused appropriations in 2017.
 
“These funds will expire on December 31, 2017 and I doubt very much if DICT will be able to utilize these funds before the year ends,” the congressman said, adding that another P5 billion and P30 billion can be sourced from the respective budgets of DAR and the DOTr.

Edited by daphne loves derby, 11 August 2017 - 11:22 AM.


#50 camiar

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 01:35 AM

 

The problem here is simple math. As I have mentioned, only a minority of Filipino students "have the qualifications to give the best return on our investment." The remaining majority are comprised of either students who are not bad but just don't have an exceptional intellectual capacity, or students who practically don't care about learning. If we are going to invest only on students who "have the qualifications to give the best return on our investment"  then it's not going to be any different from the current system we have right now which disproportionately benefits people who are already in the middle or high class of the society (where most though not all intelligent students tend to come from). 

Your logic is flawed.

 

What you don't seem to understand is that free college education is a privilege, not a right.

 

You don't seem to understand simple math, as well. See the simple math calculations below:

 

There are approximately 10 million Filipinos between 17 to 21 years old. About 7 Million of them are from poor families and 3 million are from middle and upper class. If 10% of poor students are deserving and 20% of middle and upper class meets the same academic criteria, then we will have to give free education to 1.3 million deserving Filipino college students, more than half of which (700,000 vs 600,000) are from poor families. Mas marami pa rin sa makikinabang ay mahihirap.

 

Take note:

 

Tuition Fees for acceptable quality college education for these 1.3 million students alone will already cost the government at least PhP 65 Billion pesos investment per year.


Edited by camiar, 12 August 2017 - 01:39 AM.


#51 Gwen Morales

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 12:09 PM

Investment!

Perfect term for this "Free" education.

Ano pang in eme ng mga tao?

#52 stealthfighter

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 06:19 PM

Your logic is flawed.

 

What you don't seem to understand is that free college education is a privilege, not a right.

 

You don't seem to understand simple math, as well. See the simple math calculations below:

 

There are approximately 10 million Filipinos between 17 to 21 years old. About 7 Million of them are from poor families and 3 million are from middle and upper class. If 10% of poor students are deserving and 20% of middle and upper class meets the same academic criteria, then we will have to give free education to 1.3 million deserving Filipino college students, more than half of which (700,000 vs 600,000) are from poor families. Mas marami pa rin sa makikinabang ay mahihirap.

 

Take note:

 

Tuition Fees for acceptable quality college education for these 1.3 million students alone will already cost the government at least PhP 65 Billion pesos investment per year.

 

Bro, I think you are the one who has a flawed logic in here. Allow me to break down your argument.

 

FACT: There are 10 million Filipinos between 17 to 21 years old of age.

 

FACT: 7 million out of those 10 million are from poor families and the remaining 3 million from the middle to upper class.

 

ACCORDING TO CAMIAR: If 10% of poor students are deserving and 20% of middle and upper class meets the same academic criteria, then we will have to give free education to 1.3 million deserving Filipino college students, more than half of which (700,000 vs 600,000) are from poor families. Mas marami pa rin sa makikinabang ay mahihirap.

 

There lies the big flaw in your logic, your statement begins with an "if" which implies it may happen or may not happen. What if just 2% of the poor students would qualify for the free tuition, we may never know of course unless we implement such policy. Better yet, how can you be so certain that at least 20% of those poor students would qualify for it. I am very much aware of these factors because having been a teacher for 10 years, I've seen just how much poor students are disproportionately at a disadvantage when it comes to educational opportunities in the tertiary level. 

 

WHAT WE CAN AGREE ON: I agree with you that free college education is a matter of privilege and not a right. What I would like to point out is that the proposed policy will be no better than what we have today which barely benefits the poor people simply because a lot of them may not have the qualifications to avail such privilege. I am of the opinion that the best way to extend the opportunity of tertiary education to the poor is through an optional student loan. That way, whatever money the government will spend will eventually pay off (literally) in the future. Those who can pay for college will simply pay for it and those who cannot can simply avail of the loan.  



#53 camiar

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 12:27 AM

 

Bro, I think you are the one who has a flawed logic in here. Allow me to break down your argument.

 

FACT: There are 10 million Filipinos between 17 to 21 years old of age.

 

FACT: 7 million out of those 10 million are from poor families and the remaining 3 million from the middle to upper class.

 

ACCORDING TO CAMIAR: If 10% of poor students are deserving and 20% of middle and upper class meets the same academic criteria, then we will have to give free education to 1.3 million deserving Filipino college students, more than half of which (700,000 vs 600,000) are from poor families. Mas marami pa rin sa makikinabang ay mahihirap.

 

There lies the big flaw in your logic, your statement begins with an "if" which implies it may happen or may not happen. What if just 2% of the poor students would qualify for the free tuition, we may never know of course unless we implement such policy. Better yet, how can you be so certain that at least 20% of those poor students would qualify for it. I am very much aware of these factors because having been a teacher for 10 years, I've seen just how much poor students are disproportionately at a disadvantage when it comes to educational opportunities in the tertiary level. 

 

WHAT WE CAN AGREE ON: I agree with you that free college education is a matter of privilege and not a right. What I would like to point out is that the proposed policy will be no better than what we have today which barely benefits the poor people simply because a lot of them may not have the qualifications to avail such privilege. I am of the opinion that the best way to extend the opportunity of tertiary education to the poor is through an optional student loan. That way, whatever money the government will spend will eventually pay off (literally) in the future. Those who can pay for college will simply pay for it and those who cannot can simply avail of the loan.  

The flawed premise in your logic is that free tuition benefits the middle class more than the poor. Your premise is flawed because our tax spending on free tuition should be invested only to Filipino students who qualify -- not because they are poor, but because they have the brains and the right attitude to put our investment to good use.

 

I think you were just holding back on outright saying that the benefits should favor the poor while the middle class and the rich should not benefit from free tuition. 

 

If we are giving free tuition benefits, we should give it to ALL FILIPINO students who qualify, REGARDLESS OF SOCIAL STATUS. 

 

All the rest who didn't qualify will have to avail of other ways of financing his/her college education through grants, scholarship, educational loans, and good old-fashioned  blood-sweat-and-tears of their parents.


Edited by camiar, 13 August 2017 - 12:29 AM.

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#54 stealthfighter

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 12:42 AM

The flawed premise in your logic is that free tuition benefits the middle class more than the poor. Your premise is flawed because our tax spending on free tuition should be invested only to Filipino students who qualify -- not because they are poor, but because they have the brains and the right attitude to put our investment to good use.
 
I think you were just holding back on outright saying that the benefits should favor the poor while the middle class and the rich should not benefit from free tuition. 
 
If we are giving free tuition benefits, we should give it to ALL FILIPINO students who qualify, REGARDLESS OF SOCIAL STATUS. 
 
All the rest who didn't qualify will have to avail of other ways of financing his/her college education through grants, scholarship, educational loans, and good old-fashioned  blood-sweat-and-tears of their parents.


I only want to point out that such practice (which will likely benefit most of the middle-upper class) basically defeats the purpose of free education in the first place. Why would you institute free tuition in the first place, basically to expand the reach of education to those who cannot afford it which is why socialist groups are clamoring for it. By merely making it exclusive to those who deserve it (most likely to come from middle-upper class) is basically a waste of resources since these people can pay for their education anyway with or without government assistance. That is why I don't think the policy of giving free tuition only to students who deserve it (by academic qualifications) does not make any sense in the long run since it will not address the educational needs of those people who need the most.

#55 conan the barbarian

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Posted 17 August 2017 - 09:02 AM

I agree with Sen Lacson when he said that free college tuition should benefit deserving poor students.

#56 daphne loves derby

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Posted 28 September 2017 - 02:54 PM

Free college education fund now complete

http://news.mb.com.p...d-now-complete/

 

The House of Representatives (HOR) has gathered enough funds for the full implementation of Republic Act (RA) 10931 or the Universal Access to Quality Tertiary Education Act, Rep. Karlo Nograles bared Thursday.

 

“I’m happy to announce we’ve found P40 billion to finance the free higher education [law] for 2018,” Nograles, Chairman of the House Committee on Appropriations, told reporters in a press conference

 

“We got P30 billion from the Department of Education (DepEd) for their school building program particularly those with problems on their no buildable space, no vacant lot…we were able to carve out P30 billion from that budget.

 

“The rest: from the Department of Transportation (DOTr), there are two projects there in the detailed engineering planning…it’s an ODA (Official Development Assistance) project, it is the EDSA BRT (Bus Rapid Transit) project and the Quezon Avenue BRT project. So both of them combined [and] we were able to get P3 billion to add to the free higher education [fund],” Nograles said.

 

Apart from that, HOR was able to raise P6 billion from various scholarship programs embedded in the SUCs and CHED.

“We also had various reductions in the projects of the DICT (Department of Information and Communications Technology) for ICT systems and infrastructure. So all in all, we were able to raise P40 billion,” Nograles said.


Edited by daphne loves derby, 28 September 2017 - 02:54 PM.


#57 RobertDowney

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Posted 29 September 2017 - 12:45 AM

Foi,free college, dobleng sweldo ng mga titser at sundalo, wala nang contractualization.. mga ipinangako ni Tatay Digong

#58 ismaelmd

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Posted 09 November 2017 - 10:24 PM

I think the goverment has budget for this... So I believe this soon will be applied . Many NGO's are really helping in this kind of programs.







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