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#1 popoy.com

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Posted 01 September 2004 - 07:18 AM

*med

#2 wolfy

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Posted 05 September 2004 - 04:53 AM

Symptoms: Pain when you pee. sometimes with discharge.
How to cure? Ask a fubu to sukc it out for you.

You've got way too many STD's to have a fixed set of symptoms. But those symptoms can include:

- pain (continuous or when peeing)
- rash
- red bumps
- discharge
- itching
- (open) sores

How to cure it. Go see a doctor and ask him about it, it really depends on the type of STD. More importantly: how to prevent it. Use a condom ... but even that isn't a 100% protection against some STD's

#3 Anaheim

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Posted 05 September 2004 - 09:20 AM

PM and i'll treat you guys...isang injection lang yan mga pare ko....syempre may bayad consultation fee :D

Cheers,
Doc Anaheim
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#4 MTBCommuter

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Posted 10 September 2004 - 02:13 PM

STD comes in many forms, please visit this site and find useful info
http://www.cdc.gov/n...900f3ec80009a98

#5 prinsexxx

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Posted 17 September 2004 - 12:05 AM

unusual discharge
foul odor

..pero yung ibang std walang symptoms kaya kelangan patingin sa doctor talaga.

#6 centrino

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Posted 14 October 2004 - 12:11 AM

A few questions for the pros:

1. What are the chances of getting STD even if one is wearing a condom? Or up to what extent of protection could a rubber provide? Does wearing two condoms lessen the risks?

2. Is it true that you could get STD from a BBBJ?

3. What's the most effective way to know if a girl is infected with STD?

#7 teasoy216

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Posted 22 October 2004 - 11:44 AM

Once you started pissing blood, thats the time for you to thank modern medicine for p*******cilyn

#8 drEVILmba

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Posted 27 October 2004 - 06:35 PM

If symptoms persists consult a *med



sometimes you do get infected with other agents needing different medicine

#9 hitman531ph

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Posted 28 October 2004 - 09:01 AM

Watch out for chlamydia and gonorrhea....

Up to 80% of women do not have symptoms of gonorrhea for months, even a year or so... Symptoms of gonorrhea are generally much slower to appear in women than in men....

Also, for chlamydia, there may never be symptoms at all for women but the guy who has unprotected sex with her will get it... it is also without symptoms in some men... but eventually, it will show symptoms after many months...

Chlamydia and gonorrhea are similar but not the same... Comparable to being "cousins"

See a doctor to be better informed about the difference or click on the link that was posted by someone else earlier

#10 centrino

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Posted 31 October 2004 - 02:45 AM

The october issue of FHM gives more info about STDs... nut it all sums up to the fact that the safest way to stay away from STD is abstinence from sex... If you cannot resist the urge (as most of us do) at least use some protection... It would be best to stick to a single partner whom you trust to be uninfected (your GF or wife). After all, nothing beats worry free sex right guys? :D

#11 tinman14

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Posted 04 November 2004 - 12:45 PM

pag may discharge ka every morning and medyo sakit when you pee, what does that mean?... any medication you can recommend? or any discreet clinicks you could go to? thanks

#12 palomerah

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Posted 05 November 2004 - 06:16 PM

If I have some warts on my face and chest, does it make me prone to genital warts o iba ba yun? :)

#13 murusame

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Posted 05 November 2004 - 08:49 PM

If I have some warts on my face and chest, does it make me prone to genital warts o iba ba yun? :)

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



Not really but seek some medical help with regards to you warts.

#14 magikero

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Posted 19 November 2004 - 10:18 AM

Any Idea how to Cure Genital Warts (Male and Female)? is there any ways ba except from burning the skin?

#15 mack0olay

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Posted 22 November 2004 - 08:33 AM

:cry: naku mka2tkot nga yan..
symptoms: may nana na lumlbas, masakit na puson, at hirap sa pag ihi..
cure: drink daw?? AMOXICILLIN (500mg) daily, at least 1/day.. at drink buko juice ut will help to clean ur?????............... at kng d yan epektib mag pachek-up kana sa doc.. OK?! i'm out!! :boo:

#16 MTBCommuter

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Posted 22 November 2004 - 09:47 AM

Any Idea how to Cure Genital Warts (Male and Female)? is there any ways ba except from burning the skin?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Recommended Regimens for External Genital Warts


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Patient-Applied:

Podofilox 0.5% solution or gel. Patients should apply podofilox solution with a cotton swab, or podofilox gel with a finger, to visible genital warts twice a day for 3 days, followed by 4 days of no therapy. This cycle may be repeated, as necessary, for up to four cycles. The total wart area treated should not exceed 10 cm2, and the total volume of podofilox should be limited to 0.5 mL per day. If possible, the health-care provider should apply the initial treatment to demonstrate the proper application technique and identify which warts should be treated. The safety of podofilox during pregnancy has not been established.
OR
Imiquimod 5% cream. Patients should apply imiquimod cream once daily at bedtime, three times a week for up to 16 weeks. The treatment area should be washed with soap and water 6--10 hours after the application. The safety of imiquimod during pregnancy has not been established.

Provider-Administered:

Cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen or cryoprobe. Repeat applications every 1--2 weeks.
OR
Podophyllin resin 10%--25% in a compound tincture of benzoin. A small amount should be applied to each wart and allowed to air dry. The treatment can be repeated weekly, if necessary. To avoid the possibility of complications associated with systemic absorption and toxicity, some specialists recommend that application be limited to <0.5 mL of podophyllin or an area of <10 cm2 of warts per session. Some specialists suggest that the preparation should be thoroughly washed off 1--4 hours after application to reduce local irritation. The safety of podophyllin during pregnancy has not been established.
OR
Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) or Bichloroacetic acid (BCA) 80%--90%. A small amount should be applied only to warts and allowed to dry, at which time a white "frosting" develops. If an excess amount of acid is applied, the treated area should be powdered with talc, sodium bicarbonate (i.e., baking soda), or liquid soap preparations to remove unreacted acid. This treatment can be repeated weekly, if necessary.
OR
Surgical removal either by tangential scissor excision, tangential shave excision, curettage, or electrosurgery.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Alternative Regimens


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Intralesional interferon
OR
Laser surgery.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

For patient-applied treatments, patients must be able to identify and reach warts to be treated. Podofilox 0.5% solution or gel, an antimitotic drug that destroys warts, is relatively inexpensive, easy to use, safe, and self-applied by patients. Most patients experience mild/moderate pain or local irritation after treatment. Imiquimod is a topically active immune enhancer that stimulates production of interferon and other cytokines. Local inflammatory reactions are common with the use of imiquimod; these reactions usually are mild to moderate. Traditionally, follow-up visits are not required for patients using self-administered therapy. However, follow-up may be useful several weeks into therapy to determine appropriateness of medication use and response to treatment.

Cryotherapy destroys warts by thermal-induced cytolysis. Health-care providers must be trained on the proper use of this therapy, because over- and under-treatment may result in poor efficacy or increased likelihood of complications. Pain after application of the liquid nitrogen, followed by necrosis and sometimes blistering, is common. Local anesthesia (topical or injected) may facilitate therapy if warts are present in many areas or if the area of warts is large.

Podophyllin resin, which contains several compounds including antimitotic podophyllin lignans, is another treatment option. The resin is most frequently compounded at 10%--25% in a tincture of benzoin. However, podophyllin resin preparations differ in the concentration of active components and contaminants. The shelf life and stability of podophyllin preparations are unknown. A thin layer of podophyllin resin must be applied to the warts and allowed to air dry before the treated area comes into contact with clothing; over-application or failure to air dry can result in local irritation caused by spread of the compound to adjacent areas.

Both TCA and BCA are caustic agents that destroy warts by chemical coagulation of the proteins. Although these preparations are widely used, they have not been investigated thoroughly. TCA solutions have a low viscosity comparable with that of water and can spread rapidly if applied excessively; thus, they can damage adjacent tissues. Both TCA and BCA should be applied sparingly and allowed to dry before the patient sits or stands. If pain is intense, the acid can be neutralized with soap or sodium bicarbonate.

Surgical therapy is a treatment option that has the advantage of usually eliminating warts at a single visit. However, such therapy requires substantial clinical training, additional equipment, and a longer office visit. Once local anesthesia is applied, the visible genital warts can be physically destroyed by electrocautery, in which case no additional hemostasis is required. Care must be taken to control the depth of electrocautery to prevent scarring. Alternatively, the warts can be removed either by tangential excision with a pair of fine scissors or a scalpel or by curettage. Because most warts are exophytic, this can be accomplished with a resulting wound that only extends into the upper dermis. Hemostasis can be achieved with an electrosurgical unit or a chemical styptic (e.g., an aluminum chloride solution). Suturing is neither required nor indicated in most cases when surgical removal is done properly. Surgical therapy is most beneficial for patients who have a large number or area of genital warts. Carbon dioxide laser and surgery may be useful in the management of extensive warts or intraurethral warts, particularly for those patients who have not responded to other treatments.

Interferons, either natural or recombinant, used for the treatment of genital warts have been administered systemically (i.e., subcutaneously at a distant site or IM) and intralesionally (i.e., injected into the warts). Systemic interferon is not effective. The efficacy and recurrence rates of intralesional interferon are comparable to other treatment modalities. Interferon is likely effective because of its anti-viral and/or immunostimulating effects. However, interferon therapy is not recommended for routine use because of inconvenient routes of administration, frequent office visits, and the association between its use and a high frequency of systemic adverse effects.

Because of the shortcomings of all available treatments, some clinics employ combination therapy (i.e., the simultaneous use of two or more modalities on the same wart at the same time). However, some specialists believe that combining modalities may increase complications without improving efficacy.

#17 magikero

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Posted 26 November 2004 - 10:08 AM

Bro etong mga gamot ba na ito available sa market? kasi i tried to look this solution in all mercury drug that i could drop by peo wala. thanks!


Recommended Regimens for External Genital Warts
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Patient-Applied:

Podofilox 0.5% solution or gel. Patients should apply podofilox solution with a cotton swab, or podofilox gel with a finger, to visible genital warts twice a day for 3 days, followed by 4 days of no therapy. This cycle may be repeated, as necessary, for up to four cycles. The total wart area treated should not exceed 10 cm2, and the total volume of podofilox should be limited to 0.5 mL per day. If possible, the health-care provider should apply the initial treatment to demonstrate the proper application technique and identify which warts should be treated. The safety of podofilox during pregnancy has not been established.
    OR
Imiquimod 5% cream. Patients should apply imiquimod cream once daily at bedtime, three times a week for up to 16 weeks. The treatment area should be washed with soap and water 6--10 hours after the application. The safety of imiquimod during pregnancy has not been established.

Provider-Administered:

Cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen or cryoprobe. Repeat applications every 1--2 weeks.
    OR
Podophyllin resin 10%--25% in a compound tincture of benzoin. A small amount should be applied to each wart and allowed to air dry. The treatment can be repeated weekly, if necessary. To avoid the possibility of complications associated with systemic absorption and toxicity, some specialists recommend that application be limited to <0.5 mL of podophyllin or an area of <10 cm2 of warts per session. Some specialists suggest that the preparation should be thoroughly washed off 1--4 hours after application to reduce local irritation. The safety of podophyllin during pregnancy has not been established.
    OR
Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) or Bichloroacetic acid (BCA) 80%--90%. A small amount should be applied only to warts and allowed to dry, at which time a white "frosting" develops. If an excess amount of acid is applied, the treated area should be powdered with talc, sodium bicarbonate (i.e., baking soda), or liquid soap preparations to remove unreacted acid. This treatment can be repeated weekly, if necessary.
    OR
Surgical removal either by tangential scissor excision, tangential shave excision, curettage, or electrosurgery.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Alternative Regimens
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Intralesional interferon
    OR
Laser surgery.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

For patient-applied treatments, patients must be able to identify and reach warts to be treated. Podofilox 0.5% solution or gel, an antimitotic drug that destroys warts, is relatively inexpensive, easy to use, safe, and self-applied by patients. Most patients experience mild/moderate pain or local irritation after treatment. Imiquimod is a topically active immune enhancer that stimulates production of interferon and other cytokines. Local inflammatory reactions are common with the use of imiquimod; these reactions usually are mild to moderate. Traditionally, follow-up visits are not required for patients using self-administered therapy. However, follow-up may be useful several weeks into therapy to determine appropriateness of medication use and response to treatment.

Cryotherapy destroys warts by thermal-induced cytolysis. Health-care providers must be trained on the proper use of this therapy, because over- and under-treatment may result in poor efficacy or increased likelihood of complications. Pain after application of the liquid nitrogen, followed by necrosis and sometimes blistering, is common. Local anesthesia (topical or injected) may facilitate therapy if warts are present in many areas or if the area of warts is large.

Podophyllin resin, which contains several compounds including antimitotic podophyllin lignans, is another treatment option. The resin is most frequently compounded at 10%--25% in a tincture of benzoin. However, podophyllin resin preparations differ in the concentration of active components and contaminants. The shelf life and stability of podophyllin preparations are unknown. A thin layer of podophyllin resin must be applied to the warts and allowed to air dry before the treated area comes into contact with clothing; over-application or failure to air dry can result in local irritation caused by spread of the compound to adjacent areas.

Both TCA and BCA are caustic agents that destroy warts by chemical coagulation of the proteins. Although these preparations are widely used, they have not been investigated thoroughly. TCA solutions have a low viscosity comparable with that of water and can spread rapidly if applied excessively; thus, they can damage adjacent tissues. Both TCA and BCA should be applied sparingly and allowed to dry before the patient sits or stands. If pain is intense, the acid can be neutralized with soap or sodium bicarbonate.

Surgical therapy is a treatment option that has the advantage of usually eliminating warts at a single visit. However, such therapy requires substantial clinical training, additional equipment, and a longer office visit. Once local anesthesia is applied, the visible genital warts can be physically destroyed by electrocautery, in which case no additional hemostasis is required. Care must be taken to control the depth of electrocautery to prevent scarring. Alternatively, the warts can be removed either by tangential excision with a pair of fine scissors or a scalpel or by curettage. Because most warts are exophytic, this can be accomplished with a resulting wound that only extends into the upper dermis. Hemostasis can be achieved with an electrosurgical unit or a chemical styptic (e.g., an aluminum chloride solution). Suturing is neither required nor indicated in most cases when surgical removal is done properly. Surgical therapy is most beneficial for patients who have a large number or area of genital warts. Carbon dioxide laser and surgery may be useful in the management of extensive warts or intraurethral warts, particularly for those patients who have not responded to other treatments.

Interferons, either natural or recombinant, used for the treatment of genital warts have been administered systemically (i.e., subcutaneously at a distant site or IM) and intralesionally (i.e., injected into the warts). Systemic interferon is not effective. The efficacy and recurrence rates of intralesional interferon are comparable to other treatment modalities. Interferon is likely effective because of its anti-viral and/or immunostimulating effects. However, interferon therapy is not recommended for routine use because of inconvenient routes of administration, frequent office visits, and the association between its use and a high frequency of systemic adverse effects.

Because of the shortcomings of all available treatments, some clinics employ combination therapy (i.e., the simultaneous use of two or more modalities on the same wart at the same time). However, some specialists believe that combining modalities may increase complications without improving efficacy.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



#18 MTBCommuter

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Posted 26 November 2004 - 10:16 PM

Unfortunately, wala pa yata nito sa Mercury, try mo rin magtanong sa kakilala mong doctor

#19 johnjoe

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Posted 27 November 2004 - 11:28 PM

just passing by. enjoy reading the thread.

#20 hackerops

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Posted 22 December 2004 - 12:29 PM

my friend told me that he has stains in his underware since yesterday .. medyo yellowish .. is it because he takes Vitamin C? or cum niya yun na lumalabas ng kusa? hehehe ... wala naman daw amoy at di sumasakit ang genitals niya :D




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