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#21 st

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Posted 02 May 2006 - 06:39 PM

1. "Pec" Stretch (Pectoral muscles in the front of your chest)
- Face a wall and lift one arm up as if "in a stickup." The inside of your
- Pull your elbow back so that you feel the stretch in your chest, not shoulder capsule.
- Turn away from the wall. Use the wall to gently pull your elbow back.
- Keep head and back posture in line. Don't let your back arch, or jut your chin jut forward.
- Hold just a few seconds, then switch arms.
- Drop your arms and look at your thumbs again. Thumbs should face forward now.
- Try the wall stand again. It should be easy to stand straight now.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

2. Next, stretch the top of your shoulder (Trapezius stretch)
- Tip one ear down toward your shoulder. Don't round or hunch forward, or drop or raise your chin.
- Breathe in, then while breathing out, slide your hand down the side of your body toward your knee. Feel a nice stretch along your entire side.
- Hold only a second or two then switch sides.
- Try the wall stand again and note that it is now easier to stand straight.



Do these two stretches many times a day to keep upper body posture healthy so your upper back and neck don't hurt and to stand properly without forward rounding.

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#22 st

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Posted 02 May 2006 - 06:46 PM

What To Do Every Day To Prevent Back and Neck Pain
To restore proper muscle length to allow healthy posture:

- First thing in the morning, don't sit on the bed. Instead of sitting and rounding your back first thing, turn over and lie face down. Prop gently on elbows, but not so high that it strains. It should feel good and help you straighten out first thing. Get out of bed without sitting.
- Don't droop your head forward when sitting and standing. Remember that posture is a voluntary muscular exercise.
- Pec stretch - described above.
- Trapezius stretch- described above.
- Wall Stand - described above.
- Lie on the floor (diagnostic for tightness and repositioning).
- Keep chin in, not stiffly or so tightly that it hurts, but easily so that your ear is above your shoulder, not forward of it. Remember that "the double chin" exercise is not something you "do 10 times" then stop. It is something you do once. Use it to relearn proper head position then keep it there. Stand with your back against a wall often during the day, to see if the back of your head touches as it will when you are standing in a healthy position.


More Things To Do Every Day to Prevent Forward Rounding from Ruining Your Back
- Sit without rounding.
- Stand and carry loads without forward head, or arching low back (exaggerating lumbar curve to the back or side).
- Count how many times you bend each day. Imagine the injury to your back by bending wrong that many times each day.
- Lift using the lunge, not bending over.
- Raise computer monitor off the desk - use a low shelf or phone books.
- Move your television up higher. Stop curling down and forward to watch.
- Move desk and car seats closer to sit back not forward (don’t worry about having to keep feet on floor or “flat thighs”).
- Move keyboard off “below desk” tray, and back up on the desk.
- Use lumbar roll (jacket or towel will do) to pad space in concave chairs. Sit up and lean slightly back. Don’t round against the lumbar roll.
- Use your muscles, not joints to hold you up. It’s free exercise.
- Upper back extension exercise
- Lower back extension exercise

#23 Green Lantern

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Posted 13 July 2006 - 09:39 AM

how much would that cost me doc..?pls estimate..cold my hmo cover it..?



Try to make an appointment with Dra. Tanchuling / Dr. David Cabatan / Dr. Tony Rivera / Dr. Leagogo at Philippine Orthopedic Institute, behind Makati Medical Center. These are some of the very best orthopedic surgeons in the country.
Having served under them, and having been treated by them, I can tell you that they are not the type to be quick to the knife (hindi sila opera kaagad - oopera nalang sila if it is really required)

#24 Green Lantern

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Posted 13 July 2006 - 09:41 AM

BTW, I forgot to mention, avoid any massages...
they may make things worse, lalo na yung mga hard massage

#25 emiajamar

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Posted 27 July 2006 - 08:47 AM

BTW, I forgot to mention, avoid any massages...
they may make things worse, lalo na yung mga hard massage



I would like to add that neurosurgeons are also similarly if not better than orthopedic surgeons in managing back pains whatever the cause maybe. Be it medical or surgical in nature.

From Emiajamar

#26 Green Lantern

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Posted 27 July 2006 - 08:58 AM

Neurosurgeons are excellent doctors when it comes to managing pain. Try and determine what the root cause of the pain is if you haven't already.

BTW, ÄIR WEEN" how are you feeling? It has been almost 5 months since you posted your query, can you give us an update. Thanks

#27 hint-of-lime

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 11:56 PM

I would like to add that neurosurgeons are also similarly if not better than orthopedic surgeons in managing back pains whatever the cause maybe. Be it medical or surgical in nature.

From Emiajamar



No offense to Emiajamar, but I think this statement must be taken with a grain of salt. Not all orthopedic surgeons have sufficient training in spine, thus not all will be adequately armed with the knowledge of how to optimally treat back pain; then again at the other end are some neurosurgeons who have a lot of training in the brain and spinal cord anatomy that their idea of treating back pain is to just remove the cause of the impingement on the spinal cord (and thus removing the cause of the pain), not realizing that they may be adding some instability to the spine by taking out too much bone or soft tissue and thus add to the back pain (which may be due to some inadequate knowledge of vertebral column biomechanics, which is actually more in the realm of orthopedics). I have seen morbidities of back pain patients from both neurosurgeons and orthopedic surgeons. Don't get me wrong, I know some good neurosurgeons who do excellent work. I also know some very good orthopedic spine surgeons. Sometimes, these people help each other out in difficult cases and actually complement each other - the neurosurgeons with their knowledge of the spinal cord anatomy, and the orthopedic spine surgeons with their grasp of vertebral column anatomy and biomechanics. So, I wouldn't say that one is better than the other, but rather each of these subspecialties have their own way of treating back pain. It is just that back pain is not caused by just one specific problem but by a myriad of possible pathologies of which some are best treated by an orthopedic spine surgeon and others by neurosurgeons. Rest assured, if you consult a competent (meaning properly trained!) neurosurgeon or orthopedic spine surgeon, he/she should know how to work up the patient, how to treat the patient, and when to refer to one or the other, should the need arise.

#28 Green Lantern

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Posted 29 July 2006 - 09:21 AM

Well put!
Well explained.

#29 emiajamar

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Posted 29 July 2006 - 09:37 AM

No offense to Emiajamar, but I think this statement must be taken with a grain of salt. Not all orthopedic surgeons have sufficient training in spine, thus not all will be adequately armed with the knowledge of how to optimally treat back pain; then again at the other end are some neurosurgeons who have a lot of training in the brain and spinal cord anatomy that their idea of treating back pain is to just remove the cause of the impingement on the spinal cord (and thus removing the cause of the pain), not realizing that they may be adding some instability to the spine by taking out too much bone or soft tissue and thus add to the back pain (which may be due to some inadequate knowledge of vertebral column biomechanics, which is actually more in the realm of orthopedics). I have seen morbidities of back pain patients from both neurosurgeons and orthopedic surgeons. Don't get me wrong, I know some good neurosurgeons who do excellent work. I also know some very good orthopedic spine surgeons. Sometimes, these people help each other out in difficult cases and actually complement each other - the neurosurgeons with their knowledge of the spinal cord anatomy, and the orthopedic spine surgeons with their grasp of vertebral column anatomy and biomechanics. So, I wouldn't say that one is better than the other, but rather each of these subspecialties have their own way of treating back pain. It is just that back pain is not caused by just one specific problem but by a myriad of possible pathologies of which some are best treated by an orthopedic spine surgeon and others by neurosurgeons. Rest assured, if you consult a competent (meaning properly trained!) neurosurgeon or orthopedic spine surgeon, he/she should know how to work up the patient, how to treat the patient, and when to refer to one or the other, should the need arise.


Hint-of-lime. I salute you for having stated that very eloquently. Basically it all comes down to choosing the right doctor for your particular ailment. MABUHAY :cool:

#30 Green Lantern

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Posted 30 July 2006 - 05:05 AM

If your doctor is competent enough then he will know what is within his capabilities of treating.
Otherwise, he will refer you to someone he knows can handle your case.

Edited by Green Lantern, 30 July 2006 - 05:07 AM.


#31 Green Lantern

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 05:57 AM

Hello Air Ween,
anything new on this?
I have some patients who have had success with Titanium replacements albeit only as a last recourse.

#32 hint-of-lime

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 07:55 AM

Hello Air Ween,
anything new on this?
I have some patients who have had success with Titanium replacements albeit only as a last recourse.


By titanium replacements do you mean a disc replacement (which is essentially a piece of plastic sandwiched between 2 metal pieces simulating a mobile disc - very much like your joint replacements for the hip and knee) or interbody fusion using a titanium cage-like device filled with bone graft and sandwiched between the endplates? The latter is a variation of the spinal fusion surgery commonly done using mere bone grafts in the not so distant past and the former is a newly emerging technology which reportedly preserves spinal motion after excision of the erring disc. Unfortunately, disc arthroplasty/replacement has very limited applications. Fusion surgery, on the other hand, has much more to offer - though at the sacrifice of joint motion and some future complications of a fused spine. I think it all boils down to knowing the indications for each procedure and their limitations. A knowledgeable spine surgeon should be able to explain them to you. Most spine surgeons should be able to perform a fusion surgery but there are only 5 qualified disc replacement surgeons in the country - 1 in St. Lukes, 3 in Asian Hospital, I'm not sure where the other guy is based, though. :)

#33 Green Lantern

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 10:28 AM

Very informative hint-of-lime.
The patients that I have handled (for non orthopedic reasons) only related their disk replacement experience and outcome.
They were very happy with the disk arthroplasty because it preserved their full range of motion.

Edited by Green Lantern, 20 November 2006 - 10:31 AM.


#34 Piedro08

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Posted 09 December 2006 - 11:20 AM

Very informative hint-of-lime.
The patients that I have handled (for non orthopedic reasons) only related their disk replacement experience and outcome.
They were very happy with the disk arthroplasty because it preserved their full range of motion.



i agree with the preservation of full range of motion, but i think there are still questions like on the viability and long term outcome on disc replacements, however, if you have some additional information on these please pm me. thanks

#35 hint-of-lime

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Posted 10 December 2006 - 09:11 PM

i agree with the preservation of full range of motion, but i think there are still questions like on the viability and long term outcome on disc replacements, however, if you have some additional information on these please pm me. thanks


You're right - the long term outcome studies haven't come out yet (though the DePuy Charite Lumbar Artificial Disc has a 20 year outcome report - though I don't think that this reflects the true results of the current incarnation of its artificial disc design called the Charite III - a 3rd generation model which has been in existence for much less than that amount of time). The medium term outcomes, though, report almost equal results with a fusion procedure in terms of pain relief and patient satisfaction. Now, why would one do a disc arthroplasty if the outcome is equal to a fusion? Why not fuse outright? The current thinking among spine arthroplasty surgeons is that the goal is to delay a fusion for as long as possible to avoid adjacent segment degeneration ( which is accelerated degeneration of the discs superior and inferior to a fused spinal segment which eventually become pathologic and may require surgery at these areas in the future due to pain) which has been well documented in recent years. I just feel that at this point in time, the indications are limited to young patients with pristine facet joints (some studies report limited applications with mild facet arthrosis, though) because of the reported effect of the disc on loading of the posterior facets. In other words, proper patient selection is the key to success with the current technology. And to be blunt about it - the patient's financial capability because the implants themselves already cost a small fortune.

#36 Air Ween

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 05:37 PM

been quite awhile..after my 8 sessions of physical therapy and 4 months working out, my condition improved. up to this time, all the pains disappeared..i just hope this would be permanent..or else ill just have to resort another way, that i hope you guys wud provide me..thanks alot.

i just cant imagine myself undergoing such surgeries..makes me tremble..

#37 HaxxxoR

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Posted 01 February 2007 - 09:37 PM

hi guys, I would like to know more about slipped disc, anong klaseng sakit po ba to? eto ba yung dahil sa sobrang weak ng mga muscles mo hirap kang tumayo or gumalaw (leads to muscle pains)?

#38 FastAndTheCurious

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Posted 06 February 2007 - 08:43 AM

I got a slip disk when I was young. I fell from the roof. With the lack of money before, I tried to punish myself not talking to my Mom about it to seek medical help. I cannot bend down or run but still I can walk, my back really hurts. For three or four months i dealt with the pain and without noticing it, it just went away.

Any effects that would comeout when I grew old?

#39 hint-of-lime

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Posted 17 February 2007 - 11:31 AM

HaxxxoR Posted Feb 1 2007, 02:37 PM
hi guys, I would like to know more about slipped disc, anong klaseng sakit po ba to? eto ba yung dahil sa sobrang weak ng mga muscles mo hirap kang tumayo or gumalaw (leads to muscle pains)?



The vertebral bodies in your spinal column (back bone) have a soft intervertebral disk sandwiched between them. This disk acts like a joint where the bones can move and also as a sort of cushion for shock absorption. Sometimes because of wear and tear or trauma, the disk can burst at its weakest area at the back where it is adjacent to the spinal nerve roots. At this initial phase, the symptoms will be that of severe back pain. Eventually, the gel-like substance that the disk contains may protrude out of the disk and impinge (iipitin) the nerve root. The nerve roots supply sensation to the skin and strength to the muscles. When the impingement occurs, the symptoms will be that of a sharp pain radiating from the lower back or buttocks to the area the impinged nerve supplies thus manifesting more like leg pain rather than back pain. In addition, if the impingement is severe enough, there may be some weakness of the muscles that the affected nerve root supplies and some decrease in sensation on that patch of skin that the affected nerve root supplies - though this does not always happen. Left to itself, after a certain period of time ranging from several weeks to several months and even several years, the disk gel (or nucleus pulposus) will be absorbed by the body and the radiating pain may disappear and convert back to back pain. This pain may even disappear during the course of several years if the patient can tolerate the initial symptoms.

In answer to your question, the pain is not because the muscles are weak - it is because naiiipit yung nerve and because naiiipit yung nerve, the muscles may also exhitbit some degree of weakness.


I got a slip disk when I was young. I fell from the roof. With the lack of money before, I tried to punish myself not talking to my Mom about it to seek medical help. I cannot bend down or run but still I can walk, my back really hurts. For three or four months i dealt with the pain and without noticing it, it just went away.

Any effects that would comeout when I grew old?


It is part of the natural history of back pain that the pain will eventually disappear kung matiis mo yung sakit. There may or may not be any effect on you when you grow up. IT really depends on what exactly the pathology was that you had. If it is really just the slipped disk, then there may not be any consequences. However if there was some amount of instability to the spine caused by the fall, then there may be some long term consequences. Either way, if you are asymptomatic - wala ka namang nararamdaman - at the moment with regards to your back, then probably nothing needs to be done anytime soon. You can probably have an orthopedic surgeon have a look at you if you develop some back pain in the future so he can assess your spine - given your history of previous trauma. Of course if you want a more accurate answer soon for your peace of mind, the only way would be to have x-rays taken of your spine and, if you have any of the work-ups previously done when you fell - bring those with you and have yourself and the x-ray assessed by an orthopedic surgeon particularly one sho specializes in spine.

#40 Air Ween

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Posted 13 March 2007 - 10:39 AM

npansin ko lang, whenever i gain weight mdyo may nraramdaman akong "ngawit" sa lumbar area ko whenever i bent down and then raise up..does this have anything to do with my previous condition?




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