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Who Is Into Scale Modelling?


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#41 jamboree168

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Posted 04 May 2006 - 08:38 PM

Correction: the model kit was made by Testors.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

thats correct: TESTORS.
Well if you are a traveller or have many friends in this countries you cn still find one.
1. Singapore-----flee market mostly on specialty toy shop
2. Hongkong
3. Bangkok
4. Taipei Taiwan

Japan you can find also but it is very expensive to import it here in Philippines espscially the cpostal customs but if you can befriend them.

US and UK also very expensive compare to Japan. Asian countries are more cheaper. All products are from the same supplier.
Lately I juts contact with Hasegawa and Bandai if they are willing to make a model of Camp Big Falcon, and they reply with their offer price.
Actually madami tayong dito di lang na expose with other countries.

#42 Dr_PepPeR

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Posted 05 May 2006 - 02:39 AM

Watch out - if you should get glue on a part, which is not to be glued, the glue will melt the plastic and destroy the surface of the part. If you see a small amount of glue being forced out in the join between the glued parts, resist the urge to wipe it off, or you will just smear it all over the surface and render the parts useless. Instead, wait until the glue has dried completely (it takes a day or two) and then just sand it off. It may even help to disguise the join.

While the glue cures, you should press the parts together to form a strong bond. This is most easily done by using rubber bands, clothespins, or even self-adhesive tape (masking, scotch or magic tape). Be sure to let the parts dry at least one day before doing anything more with it at this point.

By the way, the only way to make a good and pretty model is by having patience - tons of it! Often there is a lot of waiting time between two modeling steps. If you think it's boring having to wait two days after a major glue-job, why don't you work on more than one model at a time? Then you can always have something to do if you feel like it, even if one model is in "the drying phase". Lack of patience will only result in a sloppy job and an ugly model.

Advanced modelers often use superglue or cyanoacrylic glue. This is more useful when you want to glue together painted parts, need extremely strong glue joins, or when you want to fill a small gap between the mating surfaces. Superglue is also your only choice if the model you're building feature metal parts (quite common for more advanced models).

But don't use superglue on clear parts, because the fumes released as the glue cures will fog up and ruin the clear plastic parts before you know what's happening.

Superglue cures very quickly and can be sanded smooth when dry. But it's just all too easy to glue together your fingers by accident. It may sound hilarious, but is quite a frightening experience. And painful too, because superglue is very, very strong. Should you accidentally glue together your fingers, don't try to separate them, or you will lose the skin on them. Instead put your fingers under the running tap, as hot as you can stand and carefully and slowly pull your fingers apart. Using disposable gloves is not such a bad idea and never ever touch your face and eyelashes while using superglue.

Other types of glue that can be used in modeling is white glue, which dries clear and is easier to work with. Most often white glue is useful for cementing clear parts, such as canopies and windscreens, but they will not form a strong bond and cannot be used to glue together large parts or parts that need strength.

If you can, always assemble and paint the whole cockpit section before inserting it into the fuselage, as it will be nearly impossible to do later. Leave the ejection seat to be the last item you glue in place, because you really should make this piece as pretty as you can and it's a lot easier to work with if it's not glued in place.

If there is a pilot figure provided, try to do something with it to make it look more like a human than a showroom dummy. Try sawing off the arms and the head and reposition them to make the figure look like saluting, working the radar panel or making notes on the kneeboard.

You can also add custom made seat belts made of strips of masking tape. An ugly molded on oxygen hose can be replaced by a bit of thin electric wire (with the isolation part still in place). All these are very simple conversions and will make the model more impressing. Nearly all kits from the same model company contains the same pilot figure, so if you don't want the crew of your model fleet look like an army of clones you will have to do something with them anyway.


#43 Yu-gi-oh

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Posted 05 May 2006 - 07:56 AM

Mga Bossing If I try selling Scale model D2 may bibili kaya, I often go abroad andd= I think I can Get 1 or 2 on my way back.....

#44 Dr_PepPeR

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Posted 05 May 2006 - 08:21 AM

Mga Bossing If I try selling Scale model D2 may bibili kaya, I often go abroad andd= I think I can Get 1 or 2 on my way back.....

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Yes you could but I suggest you get an order list. For kits, you can get Hasegawa, Finemolds from Japan and if you go elsewhere, maybe the Eastern European kitmakers like Eduard, Roden and other hard to find kits. You might also want to consider buying aftermarket sets like paint, resin, photoetch, decals or even tools. Just be sure you have your buyers waiting for you here since the market for the hobby is not that big here.

#45 floppydrive

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Posted 05 May 2006 - 09:27 AM

Me262 Komet - Pre sorry for nitpicking but Me 262 is a Stormbird / Stromvogel. Me163 is the Komet  :D

Revell's Apollo 11 moon landing diorama was a nice build for an 11 year old kid - Can't find a model of that anymore. I haven't even remember if there is one in any store I visited.
What I didn't like about prop planes is that they only look good with the landing gears down, and it would have to be on the shelf. - exactly, & their silhouettes are the same. Jets have more 'exotic' shapes (e.g. delta wing, double delta, swept wwing, swing wing, etc)
My last build was a Bandai Enterprise NCC-1701, but it's not really a plastic model kit - it was a prepainted snapfit.  But it looks great, though! -  The Kirk or Picard Enterprise? To think of it, the only science / sci fi kits I built are Gundams. Medyo relaxin gkasi no research neccesary.
What I don't like with some decals is they turn yellow after some time.  So if it's on a white plastic kit, it looks out of place - Pre overcoat your model with Future Floor Polish. You can airbrush it since it's dilute. it acts as a protective cover yun nga lang medyo glossy dating kits mo. I read in a recent FSM back issue that you add something to Futur to make their sheen semi gloss.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Thanks for the correction. Now I remember vividly - the Me262 has 2 jet engines under the wings, while the Komet has just one inside the fuselage.

I think I saw an Apollo 11 moonlanding kit at Specialty Toys, but not sure. It might be some other Apollo mission model.

The NCC-1701 is Kirk's, as well as NCC-1701a. The NCC-1701d and NCC-1701e are Picard's. NX-01 is Scott Bakula's (don't


Yes, I remember seeing some of the AMT/ERTL Starwars kits at Winston's shops. I haven't seen the Finemolds 1/72 Millenium Falcon although basing on Finemold's prices, I'm sure that would cost a lot!

That is what I hate with Mail Order. Most of the time post office customs will rip you off for tariffs and taxes. I did a trade once with an Aussie and I asked him to dirty and soil the box so it would look used. I think there is a Pinoy mail order company that delivers door to door, they take care of ordering it for you in the US then ship it here. I just forgot their name.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Wow! I didn't know Finemolds released the Millennium Falcon! Thanks for the heads up!
Just looked it up in HLJ - it's Y19,000, so landed cost would be around P12,000! :huh: Mukhang hangang website na lang ang maaabot.

#46 Boelcke

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Posted 05 May 2006 - 10:48 AM

Ey nice! Meron palang scale modeling thread dito. Am a scale modeler too, mostly military stuff. I did try Gundam kits before, but since time is so limited nowadays Im focusing on modern military gear and figures. Post naman kayo ng pics, guys.

#47 Dr_PepPeR

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Posted 05 May 2006 - 07:34 PM

i like gundam model kits like this...

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

will try to post actual pics of my personal kits

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Sarap i weather mga ito!

#48 Yu-gi-oh

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Posted 05 May 2006 - 09:41 PM

Yes you could but I suggest you get an order list. For kits, you can get Hasegawa, Finemolds from Japan and if you go elsewhere, maybe the Eastern European kitmakers like Eduard, Roden and other hard to find kits. You might also want to consider buying aftermarket sets like paint, resin, photoetch, decals or even tools. Just be sure you have your buyers waiting for you here since the market for the hobby is not that big here.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



Thanks for the info DOC....

i like gundam model kits like this...

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

will try to post actual pics of my personal kits

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



I will have a meeting with BAN KEE TRADING next week Initially they are offering me to sell Gundam and Zoids but I am looking for Power Rangers and Yu-gi-oh. I would like to negotiate for a cheaper price compare to the selling of SM

#49 Dr_PepPeR

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Posted 06 May 2006 - 09:11 AM

Ey nice!  Meron palang scale modeling thread dito. Am a scale modeler too, mostly military stuff.  I did try Gundam kits before, but since time is so limited nowadays Im focusing on modern military gear and figures. Post naman kayo ng pics, guys.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Hi. Do you mean modern military vehicles and figures?

#50 moxman

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Posted 06 May 2006 - 09:46 AM

Scale Modelling for Noobies

this kind of hobby requires a lot of patience and dexterity.

dito nio pwede i-test ung creativity nio. use your imagination to turn a common Gundam to a worn out battle veteran.

madami na din ako nabuo na scale models and Gundam figures.
and madami pa ako andun nka stock sa kwarto un assembled.

favorite ko buuin ung Planes and Warships. mejo mahirap lang sila pagandahin kasi kulang tayo dito ng aftermarket parts. (order ka pa sa Lil's Futaba dun sa Park Square 1)

basic tools to start this kind of hobby includes
-Sprue Cutter => scissor like tool used to free the parts from the sprue (ung plastic pieces na excess ng mold)

-Glue --> can be plastic cement, super glue or white glue (elmer's)

-sandpaper -> from 400 - 1200 grit or finer (para maalis ung blemishes)

-paint -> para mas maganda ung model. /no1

Advanced hobbyists have

-Motor tool --> pwede drill, router and buffing device (para makinis ung surface)

-tweezers -> for really tight spaces

-clamps or rubber bands -> for holding the pieces in place during gluing process

-airbrush -> mas maganda ung paint job

-Candle -> para tunawin ung sprue and create antenna's and poles

-Knife set -> pwede cutter or scalpel (para gumawa ng lines and wrecks sa plastic)

Next thing to do after assembly is to create that beatitful display Base for your model

#51 moxman

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Posted 06 May 2006 - 09:49 AM

*Ship Aftermartket are abundant in Special toy's Center*
Look for extra Planes for your carrier ships and railing and radar.
makes your model look a lot better


Now here's a workbench for beginners


Basics!!

Build a hide-away workbench! Para di naka-kalat ung tools and parts mo.

Build a hideaway workbench
Ted Herman of FineScaleModeller

Posted Image


If you’ve ever found space at a premium
for modeling, perhaps I have a solution
to your dilemma. I’ve had some cramped
quarters in my time, so I put my thinking
cap on to find workspace where there
wasn’t any. I came up with what I call
“The Hideaway Workbench,” or “The
Murphy Bench for the Living Space
Impaired.”
Cut and paste. The design is flexible.
As long as you follow the formulas
here, you can easily modify the overall
dimensions to accommodate your particular
needs. To build the bench as shown,
you’ll need the better part of a 4' x 8' sheet
of plywood (Grade B or better).
Feel confident to cut out all the pieces
shown in the plans for a trouble-free
assembly. This enables you to use a table
saw, band saw, and various other wood
shop tools of a friend if you do not own
them yourself. Just follow the cutting list
for the plywood and the dimensional
lumber. Lightly mark each piece with an
identifying mark (for example: B1/Top
cabinet, etc.) so that when you are assembling
the unit you can easily note what
part of the structure you’re handling.
At this point you’ll have a large pile of
lumber to be assembled. All joints are
simple butt joints that are glued (use carpenter’s
glue for the best bonds), then
screwed together. I found that this gives
you more than enough strength and durability.
For those with the time and the
know-how, mortised or rabbet joints
could be implemented, although this
would cause a reconfiguring of the given
dimensions and formulas.
Assembly required. Start by
assembling the base frame. Be sure to
pre-drill and countersink the holes for the
3" No. 10 wood screws. Drill to a depth
of 1" minimum at joints where you are
drilling through 3" of wood. Otherwise a
1⁄2" countersink is sufficient. You can
mark your drill bit with masking tape at
the proper depth to make this process
easier. I recommend that all joints be
glued, with two screws added at each
joint. Once complete, you can attach the
base’s bottom with 11⁄2" No. 8 wood
screws.
Posted Image

*All dimensions given in inches
Component A: 96"-2 by 4 dimensional lumber 3 needed
Component B: 48 x 96-3⁄4-inch plywood (grade B or better) 1 needed
Component C: 48 x 96-1⁄4-inch Masonite or plywood 1 needed
Lower cabinet/stand (Component A)
Piece No. Size Quantity
1 27" 4
2 30" 8
3 5" 4
4 6.5" 4
Upper cabinet (Component B)
Piece No. Size Quantity
1 24" x 30" 2
2 10.5" x 28.5" 1
3 10.5" x 30" 2
4 5.25" x 28.5" 1
5 8.25" x 5.25" 1
Covers/ fascia for door and base (Component C)
(Not shown in illustrations)
Piece No. Size Quantity
1 30" x 13.5" 2
2 30" x 12" 2
3 30" x 30.5" 1
Hardware List
Piece
No. Type Quantity
H1 2" x 11⁄2" flush-mount hinge 4
H2 3" draw latch 1
H3 No. 10 x 3" wood screws 60
H4* No. 8 x 1⁄2" bugle head wood screws 60
H5 No. 6 x 1" finishing nails 1lb
H6 No. 8 x 1⁄2" pan head wood screws 20
H7 30" x 1 1⁄2" piano hinge 1
*can substitute No. 6 11⁄2" finishing nails
Cutting List
Posted Image

Posted Image

The supports and optional lower doors
section can be assembled next. This is
merely a four-piece framework, made
from 2 by 4s. The holes for the screws will
need to be pre-drilled and countersunk as
they were in the base framework.
Assemble them with 3" No. 10 wood
screws.

Posted Image

Now attach the sheathing to the outside
of the base with finishing nails 3⁄4" to
1" in length. You can now, if you wish, fill
the countersink holes with either dowel
rods cut and sanded flush or with filler
putty. If you choose to enclose the lower
section, attach the doors to the base with
hinges as specified in the drawings. The
base can now be set aside until later.
Next, turn your attention to the cabinet.
Start by laying the back out on a flat
surface. Prepare the sides by applying glue
to the mating surfaces. These can be
attached using 11⁄2" #8 bugle-head screws
or can be nailed with finishing nails. If
you are using finishing nails and a hammer,
you will need to clamp the parts
until the glue has time to set. (Screws and
pneumatic nailing will not require clamping.)
After this, prep and attach the top,
then the bottom, to the cabinet. The
result should be a large box.
Assemble the dividers to the shelf
(before inserting them into the cabinet).
When marking the shelf for placement of
the dividers, transfer the marks to the
inside of the top (this way, there will be
no need for squares later on). All of these
pieces should be assembled with glue and
fasteners. Be sure to run a row of fasteners
down the back of the cabinet at the
shelf, too. This will give the support
needed to prevent the shelf from sagging
under a load. Cubbys are shown in drawings
but shelving can be easily modified
to meet your needs. If you plan on applying
a finish to the cabinet, now is a good
time to do it. Be sure to finish the folddown
front at the same time.
Once all this is done, you can attach
the cabinet to the base. Use 11⁄2" No. 8
bugle-head screws in at least the four corners
and along the back every 12". Now
assemble the front to the base using the
drawings as a guide. Use 1⁄2" No. 8 panhead
wood screws or the hardware
provided with your hinge set. Attach the
draw latch to the top of the cabinet centered
across the top according to the
manufacturer’s instructions and you
should be finished.
Open the doors to 90 degrees from
closed, unlatch and lower the cabinet
front until it rests on the open doors, and
presto, the bench is in operation. This
cabinet is both strong and space saving.
You can add a power strip to the cabinet
or the base, and a swing-arm light can be
easily installed on the top!

Posted Image


Yan! meron na kayong work bench! /no1

#52 moxman

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Posted 06 May 2006 - 09:49 AM

*Ship Aftermartket are abundant in Special toy's Center*
Look for extra Planes for your carrier ships and railing and radar.
makes your model look a lot better


Now here's a workbench for beginners


Basics!!

Build a hide-away workbench! Para di naka-kalat ung tools and parts mo.

Build a hideaway workbench
Ted Herman of FineScaleModeller

Posted Image


If you’ve ever found space at a premium
for modeling, perhaps I have a solution
to your dilemma. I’ve had some cramped
quarters in my time, so I put my thinking
cap on to find workspace where there
wasn’t any. I came up with what I call
“The Hideaway Workbench,” or “The
Murphy Bench for the Living Space
Impaired.”
Cut and paste. The design is flexible.
As long as you follow the formulas
here, you can easily modify the overall
dimensions to accommodate your particular
needs. To build the bench as shown,
you’ll need the better part of a 4' x 8' sheet
of plywood (Grade B or better).
Feel confident to cut out all the pieces
shown in the plans for a trouble-free
assembly. This enables you to use a table
saw, band saw, and various other wood
shop tools of a friend if you do not own
them yourself. Just follow the cutting list
for the plywood and the dimensional
lumber. Lightly mark each piece with an
identifying mark (for example: B1/Top
cabinet, etc.) so that when you are assembling
the unit you can easily note what
part of the structure you’re handling.
At this point you’ll have a large pile of
lumber to be assembled. All joints are
simple butt joints that are glued (use carpenter’s
glue for the best bonds), then
screwed together. I found that this gives
you more than enough strength and durability.
For those with the time and the
know-how, mortised or rabbet joints
could be implemented, although this
would cause a reconfiguring of the given
dimensions and formulas.
Assembly required. Start by
assembling the base frame. Be sure to
pre-drill and countersink the holes for the
3" No. 10 wood screws. Drill to a depth
of 1" minimum at joints where you are
drilling through 3" of wood. Otherwise a
1⁄2" countersink is sufficient. You can
mark your drill bit with masking tape at
the proper depth to make this process
easier. I recommend that all joints be
glued, with two screws added at each
joint. Once complete, you can attach the
base’s bottom with 11⁄2" No. 8 wood
screws.
Posted Image

*All dimensions given in inches
Component A: 96"-2 by 4 dimensional lumber 3 needed
Component B: 48 x 96-3⁄4-inch plywood (grade B or better) 1 needed
Component C: 48 x 96-1⁄4-inch Masonite or plywood 1 needed
Lower cabinet/stand (Component A)
Piece No. Size Quantity
1 27" 4
2 30" 8
3 5" 4
4 6.5" 4
Upper cabinet (Component B)
Piece No. Size Quantity
1 24" x 30" 2
2 10.5" x 28.5" 1
3 10.5" x 30" 2
4 5.25" x 28.5" 1
5 8.25" x 5.25" 1
Covers/ fascia for door and base (Component C)
(Not shown in illustrations)
Piece No. Size Quantity
1 30" x 13.5" 2
2 30" x 12" 2
3 30" x 30.5" 1
Hardware List
Piece
No. Type Quantity
H1 2" x 11⁄2" flush-mount hinge 4
H2 3" draw latch 1
H3 No. 10 x 3" wood screws 60
H4* No. 8 x 1⁄2" bugle head wood screws 60
H5 No. 6 x 1" finishing nails 1lb
H6 No. 8 x 1⁄2" pan head wood screws 20
H7 30" x 1 1⁄2" piano hinge 1
*can substitute No. 6 11⁄2" finishing nails
Cutting List
Posted Image

Posted Image

The supports and optional lower doors
section can be assembled next. This is
merely a four-piece framework, made
from 2 by 4s. The holes for the screws will
need to be pre-drilled and countersunk as
they were in the base framework.
Assemble them with 3" No. 10 wood
screws.

Posted Image

Now attach the sheathing to the outside
of the base with finishing nails 3⁄4" to
1" in length. You can now, if you wish, fill
the countersink holes with either dowel
rods cut and sanded flush or with filler
putty. If you choose to enclose the lower
section, attach the doors to the base with
hinges as specified in the drawings. The
base can now be set aside until later.
Next, turn your attention to the cabinet.
Start by laying the back out on a flat
surface. Prepare the sides by applying glue
to the mating surfaces. These can be
attached using 11⁄2" #8 bugle-head screws
or can be nailed with finishing nails. If
you are using finishing nails and a hammer,
you will need to clamp the parts
until the glue has time to set. (Screws and
pneumatic nailing will not require clamping.)
After this, prep and attach the top,
then the bottom, to the cabinet. The
result should be a large box.
Assemble the dividers to the shelf
(before inserting them into the cabinet).
When marking the shelf for placement of
the dividers, transfer the marks to the
inside of the top (this way, there will be
no need for squares later on). All of these
pieces should be assembled with glue and
fasteners. Be sure to run a row of fasteners
down the back of the cabinet at the
shelf, too. This will give the support
needed to prevent the shelf from sagging
under a load. Cubbys are shown in drawings
but shelving can be easily modified
to meet your needs. If you plan on applying
a finish to the cabinet, now is a good
time to do it. Be sure to finish the folddown
front at the same time.
Once all this is done, you can attach
the cabinet to the base. Use 11⁄2" No. 8
bugle-head screws in at least the four corners
and along the back every 12". Now
assemble the front to the base using the
drawings as a guide. Use 1⁄2" No. 8 panhead
wood screws or the hardware
provided with your hinge set. Attach the
draw latch to the top of the cabinet centered
across the top according to the
manufacturer’s instructions and you
should be finished.
Open the doors to 90 degrees from
closed, unlatch and lower the cabinet
front until it rests on the open doors, and
presto, the bench is in operation. This
cabinet is both strong and space saving.
You can add a power strip to the cabinet
or the base, and a swing-arm light can be
easily installed on the top!

Posted Image


Yan! meron na kayong work bench! /no1

#53 thirteen

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Posted 06 May 2006 - 06:08 PM

Could somebody give me tips on what airbrush to buy and where i can buy it? What's a decent budget to allocate for an airbrush set? Did a few models before in grade school and highschool, but i always used the spray cans for painting. Thing is, the spray cans don't really offer that much control when it comes to detailing. thanks!

#54 Yu-gi-oh

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Posted 06 May 2006 - 06:08 PM

I prefer glass case......

#55 Dr_PepPeR

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Posted 07 May 2006 - 12:38 AM

Could somebody give me tips on what airbrush to buy and where i can buy it? What's a decent budget to allocate for an airbrush set? Did a few models before in grade school and highschool, but i always used the spray cans for painting. Thing is, the spray cans don't really offer that much control when it comes to detailing. thanks!

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


I would recommend the Tamiya Sprayworks. It has a decent airbrush and a decent compressor. I got mine for about 3K a few years ago. Next for me would be a Badger, one of the gravity feed ones, but you will need a decent compressor, not one of those small ones for pumping tires or those diaphragm compressors. I have a Badger 150 and I got it for about 3K then a 1/2 HP compressor with a holding tank for 7K.

BTW does anyone know where I can buy sandpaper with grit of 1800 up to 10000?

Also, anyone where I can get 3M Acryl Blue?


#56 Dr_PepPeR

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Posted 07 May 2006 - 12:45 AM

With the cockpit section assembled and painted, it's usually best to start working on the wheels, landing gears and weapons. Even if the description tells you differently, you might as well start on this task right away, because cleaning up drop tanks, missiles and bombs can be quite time consuming. This is even more true for aircraft such as the F-14 Tomcat, carrying a ton of missiles. I like to file down the fins of the missiles as much as I can, so that they won't look like they are made of two inches thick armor plate.

Before joining the fuselage halves, there are a few things to take care of. I recommend that you spray the entire inside of the model black or dark gray. Discovering that you can see naked unpainted plastic through air scoops and other small apertures is not something you want to do. Also don't forget to check if there will be some areas where you can see through the model. On some jet fighter models, sometimes you can actually peek through the jet intakes and see the light at the end of the jet pipe. To prevent this awful effect, either glue sheets of styrene cards, or at least put some stuffing material inside the fuselage.

It is also important to check the weight center of the model. Especially for tricycle landing gears it is important that the weight center is ahead of the main landing gears, or the model will not sit correctly on the main gears and the nosewheel, but instead on the main gears and the model's tail. A few bolts or lead weights in the nose cone takes care of this. Just make sure that the weights are firmly attached, or they might shake loose during the consecutive building steps and rattle inside the model - very annoying!

If you can, try to place the cockpit tub in position at the same time as you join the fuselage halves. If you first glue the cockpit tub onto one half of the fuselage (as it is often described in the instructions), you risk ending up with a very nasty and hard-to-conceal gap appearing on the other side.

Assembling the fuselage halves, the wing halves and the wings to the fuselage is a very pleasant step - it is the first time that you can apprehend the size and the shapes of the model. But it can also be a tricky step as you will have to glue quite large pieces of plastic together, and it is just all too easy to mess up! Also make sure that the fit is as close to perfect as it's possible. Practice dry-fitting the parts at least two or three times before start squeezing the glue.

Once the parts are joined but before the glue has cured, check all the mating lines, so that the parts are not offset a little bit. It's best to examine the mating lines in a strong light source coming from the side. If you miss this part, you will later have to perform some very hard filling, sanding and panel line rescribing sessions to remedy the problem.

Even the best model and the most careful dry-fitting will often result in a "seam" or join line between the assembled parts. Removing the seams and join lines is essential for the model to look as a fine replica of a real life object, and not just a bunch of plastic parts sloppily glued together.

Some assemblies almost always tend to result in unnatural gaps or cracks between the parts. Usual problem areas are for instance the wing roots (where the wings meet the fuselage of the aircraft) and the mating line between the left and the right part of the fuselage. If left unattended, these areas will give your model a rather "toy-like" appearance.

Getting rid of these areas is really not a hard or complicated work, but it will take time, patience and a few tools: a sharp model knife (X-Acto knife), some wet-and-dry sandpaper of various grades (600 - 1500 grade), model putty, primer and a paint brush or an airbrush.

Sometimes - on more expensive Japanese models - only some scraping with the back of the blade is needed to make the worst mating lines disappear. But on other models, several filling and sanding sessions must often be done.


#57 Boelcke

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Posted 07 May 2006 - 02:02 AM

Hi. Do you mean modern military vehicles and figures?

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Yep. Planes, ships, armored vehicles. Mostly modern. Im currently working on a 1/72 F-14 Tomcat. Ill try posting pics here when Im done. Kaso baka matagalan ng konti.

:)

#58 Dr_PepPeR

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Posted 07 May 2006 - 02:10 AM

Yep. Planes, ships, armored vehicles.  Mostly modern. Im currently working on a 1/72 F-14 Tomcat. Ill try posting pics here when Im done. Kaso baka matagalan ng konti.

:)

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Kewl! We'll be waiting sir!

#59 artvader

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Posted 07 May 2006 - 10:12 AM

any tips on how to do "aztec-ing"?

#60 Yu-gi-oh

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Posted 07 May 2006 - 01:31 PM

yun ang wala ko patient....kaya nagbebenta na lang me.....




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