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#1 zolber

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 11:56 AM

Winnie Monsod, in her column in today's Inquirer, said she would not vote for any member of any political dynasty even if she or he is competent. She said:

"The vicious cycle here for the country and the powerless is that once a family member gets into public office, the accumulation of election money from public funds begins (with few exceptions) and grows bigger as other family members get elected. Membership in the legislature seems to be particularly lucrative (else why are both chambers so secretive about the allocation of their respective budgets?). The temptation is great and hard to resist. And even with no kickbacks on infrastructure projects, there are hidden benefits to being in power, like a road leading to family land or priority in connecting electricity, water and other amenities. Or family members getting appointed to public office. With kickbacks on infrastructure projects, the family wealth and election kitty grow by leaps and bounds. What chance do qualified and poor aspirants for public office have in this system? Not much, and eventually nothing, as the cancer in the system gets bigger. Public office morphs from public trust to private business."

I fully agree with her. So, in next year's election, I will not vote for any member of any political dynasty. And if there is any movement against political dynasties, I will join it.

What do you think?

#2 zolber

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 12:33 PM

@zolber

So what do you think of the Binays?


The Binays are like the Angaras and the Estradas -- members of a powerful political dynasty. This dynasty has a vice president, a mayor, and a congressman. Soon, if the eldest daughter wins, there will be a senator. Too much concentration of political power and resources in one small family.

The Binays may be competent. But they prevent others who may be more competent than they are from serving in the positions they are holding. So, like Winnie Monsod, I will not vote for any of them next year and the years to come.

This move against political dynasties must snowball to restore sanity in the country's politics.

#3 TheSmilingBandit

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 01:02 PM

Political dynasties exist in almost all countries, however they are very thick-faced in Hispanic-based cultures is what I noticed.


#4 TheSmilingBandit

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 01:13 PM

Are you talking about Latin American countries? If yes, why do you say that they are brazen?

Latin America and the Philippines, the reason for the brazenness is probably due to the hispanic culture of manana mixed with the que sera sera habit plus the fairly common hidalgo (noble) families being on top of the peasants that are steeped in these latin cultures.


#5 scam

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 01:19 PM

It's ironic that those who fought against political dynasty during the Marcos era
the now the very exact same persons/families that get to benefit from them.

We only have the poor to blame as to why our political spectrum is such as it is today.

#6 TheSmilingBandit

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 02:43 PM

Speaking of noble families which are the oligarchs, I presume, the scions of these families, I think have a better chance of winning elective posts due to their financial capacity to sustain a campaign.

By the way, this is a bit out of topic but I'm just curious. How are the oligarchs brazen with the peasants?

Not exactly, while some oligarchic families are technically among the political dynasties (e.g. Mar Roxas is a member of the oligarchic Araneta clan) most political families are not among the oligarchy. As a general rule the oligarchic families avoid politics among themselves as running for office would be a waste of their time since they own whichever politicians happens to be sitting in power (e.g. the Zobel-Ayalas themselves don't run for office, but whomever runs among certain southern cities within Metro Manila know which side of their bread is buttered thus giving the Z-A family the benefit of the doubt when it comes to bending the rules.)

Now as to how the political families are so brazen and two-faced, the example is during a scion of one of those political families, who when asked about political dynasties by an American journalist replied with a grin "we have [a] anti-dynasty law in our constitution but it does not have any definition of terms."

The journalist then asked if its not obvious what political dynasties mean, to which this young buck grinned even wider and said "without the definition of terms that law cannot be applied." The journalist then wondered why no definition of terms was ever included in the law, the answer came back as "because all those who crafted the laws belong to the political families, why make a law to limit yourselves?"

Of course, this was all off the record and I was much saddened because I was sitting right there and realized that there would never come a time for the Philippines to be free from the stranglehold of the various political families, specially with the backing of the various oligarchic families. This conversation occurred some 25 years ago, and even the rest of the conversation holds true today.

The poor Philippines, destined never to be released from the grasp of these people barring that most final of all solutions.


#7 TheSmilingBandit

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 03:26 PM

I think Congress should add the definition of terms to that anti-dynasty law. So the young buck imputed his own ilk based on your post TSB.

ROFL as I quoted, no congressman will define those terms as they are all going to groom their own family members into the political system. In fact we are SPECIFICALLY mentioned in Wiki as one of the few countries with such blatant political dynasties.

http://en.wikipedia....the_Philippines


#8 dfgvan

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 03:46 PM

huh???

isn't it required in the bill to have section 2 or section 3 for the definition of terms?

some good read for you all

Political Reform and Elite Persistence
=====================================================




An excerpt from Nalzaro's Political Dynasty

They have their own definition of political dynasty. Santiago, in her Senate Bill (SB) 2649, said in her explanatory note: “The playing field of the political arena should be leveled and opened to persons who are equally qualified to aspire on even terms with those from ruling politically dominant families.”

SB 2649 says that no spouse or person related within the second civil degree of consanguinity or affinity to an incumbent elective official seeking reelection shall be allowed to hold or run for any elective office in the same province in the same election. The measure says “second civil degree of consanguinity or affinity shall refer to the relatives of a person who may be the latter’s brother or sister, whether full or half-blood, direct ascendant or descendant, whether legitimate, illegitimate or adopted, including their spouses.”

If the incumbent official holds a national position, the bill says his or her relatives shall only be disqualified from running in the province where the official is a registered voter. But if there are also candidates who are related in a similar prohibited degree, they shall also be disqualified from running for any local office within the same province and the same election.

Santiago’s bill likewise says that no person related within second civil degree of consanguinity or affinity to any incumbent official shall be allowed to immediately succeed the position of the latter except for punong barangays or members of the Sangguniang Barangay.

Edited by dfgvan, 06 October 2012 - 04:01 PM.


#9 TheSmilingBandit

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 03:53 PM

It wasn't a bill, it was written directly into the 1987 constitution, see Article 2, Section 26, and as written is extremely ambiguous and thus full of loopholes because of the lack of definition of terms.

By the way, just in case anyone missed it, the wikipedia also has a List of Political Families in the Philippines

1 Abad Family (Batanes)
2 Abalos Family (Mandaluyong City)
3 Acosta Family (Bukidnon)
4 Albano Family (Isabela)
5 (Alonto-Adiong Family) ==(Lanao del Sur and Lanao del Norte)
6 Angara Family (Aurora)
7 Aquino Family (Sorsogon & Agusan del Sur (CARAGA))
8 Arroyo Family (Negros Occidental)
9 Asistio Family (Caloocan City)
10 Binay Family (Makati City)
11 Cayetano Family (Taguig)
12 Cerilles Family (Zamboanga del Sur)
13 Cojuangco Family (Tarlac)
14 Crisologo Family (Ilocos Sur)
15 Cua Family (Quirino)
16 Cuenco Family (Cebu)
17 Datumanong Family (Maguindanao)
18 Del Mar Family (Cebu)
19 Dimaporo Family (Lanao del Norte, Lanao del Sur)
20 Dominguez Family
21 Duavit Family (Rizal)
22 Dumlao Family (Nueva Vizcaya)
23 Duremdes Family (Iloilo)
24 Dy Family (Isabela)
25 Enrile Family (Cagayan)
26 Ecleo Family (Dinagat Islands)
27 Escudero Family (Sorsogon)
28 Estrada Family (San Juan City)
29 Fajardo Family (Nueva Ecija / Cavite / Rizal / Manila / Pampanga / Bulacan / Quezon)
30 Fua Family (Siquijor)
31 Fuentebella Family (Camarines Sur/negros)
32 Gaces Family (Southern Leyte)
33 Galicia Family (Davao Region)
34 Garin Family (Iloilo)
35 Gomez Family (Laguna)
36 Gordon Family (Zambales)
37 Imperial Family (Albay)
38 Jaen Family (Leganes,Iloilo)
39 Jalosjos Family (Zamboanga del Norte, Zamboanga Sibugay)
40 Joson Family (Nueva Ecija)
41 Lacson Family (Negros Occidental, Manila)
42 Lapus Family (Tarlac)
43 Laurel Family (Batangas)
44 Lim Family (Southern Leyte)
45 Lim Family (Palawan)
46 Lobregat Family (Zamboanga City)
47 Lopez Family (Iloilo)
48 Lucero Family (Northern Samar/Zamboanga del Sur)
49 Lim Family (Jimenez, Misamis Occidental)
50 (( Lucman Family (Lanao del Sur))
51 Magsaysay Family (National)/ZAMBALES/La Union/Batangas/Makati City/Quezon City/Manila City/Bulacan)
52 Marcos Family (Ilocos Norte)
53 Mangudadatu Family (Sultan Kudarat, Maguindanao )
54 Macapagal Family (Pampanga)
55 Mendiola/Siojo/Mercado Family (Bulacan, Pampanga, Mindoro, Samar)
56 Nepomuceno (Pampanga)
57 Mitra Family (Palawan)
58 Ortega Family (La Union/Negros Oriental)
59 Osmeña Family (Cebu)
60 Plaza Family (Agusan del Sur, Agusan del Norte, Cagayan)
61 Pinili Family ( Dumaguete City, Bais City and Negros Oriental)
62 Rama Family (Cebu)
63 Ramos Family (Pangasinan)
64 Recto Family (Batangas)
65 Remulla Family (Cavite)
66 Revilla Family (Cavite)
67 Reyes Family (Marinduque)
68 Reyes Family (Palawan)
69 Roco Family (Camarines Sur)
70 Romualdez/ Lopez Family (Leyte)
71 Roxas Family (Capiz)
72 Santillan Family (Batangas, Cavite, Manila, Antique, Albay, Pampanga)
73 Sandoval Family (Palawan, Navotas)
74 Singson Family (Ilocos Sur)
75 Sinsuat Family (Maguindanao)
76 Sumulong Family (Rizal)
77 Espinosa/Martinez Family (Cebu/Masbate)
78 Tañada Family (Quezon)
79 Ty Family (Surigao del Sur)
80 Uy Family (Isabela)
81 Villar-Aguilar Family (Las Piñas City)
82 Villarreal Family
83 Zubiri Family (Bukidnon)


That list isn't even complete since there is an estimated 170 political families in this country on the national, provincial, and city levels.

#10 dfgvan

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 04:06 PM

yep tsb...

at 15th congress snb 2649, santiago declared her position

#11 TheSmilingBandit

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 04:35 PM

Senate Bill 2649 is not a law, its just a bill, and as I recall the lower house must also sponsor a similar bill, just how many congressmen and senators will vote aye for a bill that will disqualify their families from running I wonder.

#12 vexy9

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 09:56 PM

As to the question, I won't vote for someone who is a member of a political dynasty.

+2

#13 zolber

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 07:30 AM

The Philippine Star reported today that political dynasties are set to dominate the 2013 polls. Here is an interesting excerpt from the report:

CenPeg said political dynasties “are more blatant and active today.”

“Definitely alarming today is the entrenchment of the system of political dynasties on a higher and more blatant scale, making the fair representation of the large majority of Filipinos even more elusive,” the group said.

Cenpeg noted the “conditions to form ‘more of the same’ are more encouraging than ever under the administration of P-Noy, himself a benefactor of this culture of political patronage.”



The group estimates that almost 50 percent of the country’s current political dynasties “owe their ascendancy to post-Marcos (1986) political deals when most elective positions were filled up by appointees of then President Corazon Aquino, including the Ampatuans of the infamous Maguindanao massacre.”

“Membership in a political dynasty is a guarantee to its preservation. Whether in the national or local level, membership provides a political clout to amass more wealth, hence, to secure enduring political power,” CenPeg added.

The group said traditionally, the “turnover of elective positions by end-termers to their heirs-apparent – spouses, children, or other relatives – helps preserve the dynasties.”

“Elections are tilted in favor of the rich and celebrities and are inherently vulnerable to fraud. Elections provide the mechanism for conferring legitimacy to elite power and create the illusion once every three years that ‘change’ is possible,” CenPeg added.


Ginagago talaga ng mga politiko ang mga Pilipino. Let us express our collective anger by not voting for a member of a political dynastty.

#14 friendly0603

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 08:21 AM

Just look at the marcoses: imelda, imee & bongbong :) even after all that their family had done they are still winning elections

#15 TheSmilingBandit

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 11:13 AM

The Philippine Star reported today that political dynasties are set to dominate the 2013 polls. Here is an interesting excerpt from the report:

CenPeg said political dynasties “are more blatant and active today.”

“Definitely alarming today is the entrenchment of the system of political dynasties on a higher and more blatant scale, making the fair representation of the large majority of Filipinos even more elusive,” the group said.

Cenpeg noted the “conditions to form ‘more of the same’ are more encouraging than ever under the administration of P-Noy, himself a benefactor of this culture of political patronage.”



The group estimates that almost 50 percent of the country’s current political dynasties “owe their ascendancy to post-Marcos (1986) political deals when most elective positions were filled up by appointees of then President Corazon Aquino, including the Ampatuans of the infamous Maguindanao massacre.”

“Membership in a political dynasty is a guarantee to its preservation. Whether in the national or local level, membership provides a political clout to amass more wealth, hence, to secure enduring political power,” CenPeg added.

The group said traditionally, the “turnover of elective positions by end-termers to their heirs-apparent – spouses, children, or other relatives – helps preserve the dynasties.”

“Elections are tilted in favor of the rich and celebrities and are inherently vulnerable to fraud. Elections provide the mechanism for conferring legitimacy to elite power and create the illusion once every three years that ‘change’ is possible,” CenPeg added.


Ginagago talaga ng mga politiko ang mga Pilipino. Let us express our collective anger by not voting for a member of a political dynastty.

I agree, however I feel that due to the lack of alternatives even if the concerned citizenry do not vote for them, who would they vote for?

Even worse, without the law being given teeth, what is to stop the new politicians from forming their own new dynasties?


#16 kempaf

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 12:00 PM

Welcome to the club, the Pacquiaos... :wacko: :huh:

#17 lomex32

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 02:35 PM

The Binays

Papa Binay - VP
Son JunJun - Mayor
Mama Binay - For Congress
Daughter - For Senator

#18 zolber

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 02:50 PM

I agree, however I feel that due to the lack of alternatives even if the concerned citizenry do not vote for them, who would they vote for?

Even worse, without the law being given teeth, what is to stop the new politicians from forming their own new dynasties?


There are few alternatives because many are afraid to tangle with the well-entrenched members of political dynasties. Perhaps, if they see that people are voting against the political dynasties many will be encouraged to throw their hat in the political arena.

The new politicians will be discouraged from forming new dynasties if they see people are overwhelmingly against political dynasties.

Let's start eroding the power of political dynasties by not voting for their members in the coming elections.

#19 zolber

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 04:44 PM

Dismantling a political dynasty is difficult, especially, if it is well-rooted. But it can be done. The opponent of an incumbent who is a member of a political dynasty should have a "dismantle this political dynasty" battlecry, aside, of course, from his/her campaign platform.


I agree. A candidate cannot do it alone without the help of the voters.

Voting against political dynasties is a veritable peaceful revolution. Let us all join this revolution.

#20 TheSmilingBandit

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 10:18 PM

There are few alternatives because many are afraid to tangle with the well-entrenched members of political dynasties. Perhaps, if they see that people are voting against the political dynasties many will be encouraged to throw their hat in the political arena.

The new politicians will be discouraged from forming new dynasties if they see people are overwhelmingly against political dynasties.

Let's start eroding the power of political dynasties by not voting for their members in the coming elections.

I agree with the sentiments however I think that the first step is to educate the voters, which would be the greatest problem it seems.

The Binays

Papa Binay - VP
Son JunJun - Mayor
Mama Binay - For Congress
Daughter - For Senator

I believe his other daughter is a congresswoman.

I think so, daughter Abigail is the congresswoman and daughter Nancy is the one running for the senate.

I agree. A candidate cannot do it alone without the help of the voters.

Voting against political dynasties is a veritable peaceful revolution. Let us all join this revolution.

The tree of liberty oft must have its roots refreshed by the blood of patriots
-Patrick Henry (I think)


As an aside, during the 2010 elections fully 75% of the elected officials were members (one way or the other) of political dynasties.

Edited by TheSmilingBandit, 07 October 2012 - 10:21 PM.





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