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#1 Bwalkin

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Posted 18 June 2006 - 10:23 PM

Anyone here knows the rate of personal trainers?
Gold's and fitness first etc.
I'm a little bit in need of motivators at tsaka tagabigay ng workout pla tAga sabi kung tama yun workout ko. thanks mtc

#2 Eclipseguy

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 12:05 AM

Anyone here knows the rate of personal trainers?
Gold's and fitness first etc.
I'm a little bit in need of motivators at tsaka tagabigay ng workout pla tAga sabi kung tama yun workout ko. thanks mtc

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At Fitness First, it's 770 according to their former members who are now with us. Slimmers ranges from 400-1200. The trainers who charge 1200 are very rare and they are mainly freelancing inside Slimmers. Golds ranges from 500-1000.

All of the aforementioned have to split their fee 50-50 or 60-40 with the gym. So, for example, if you are paying a trainer at Gold's 1000 per session, Gold's keeps 600 and the trainer keeps 400 if it's 60-40.

At Eclipse, we don't take a cut of the trainer's private fee, so they will charge between P250-1000 per session. The P1000 coaches are world class competitors while those who charge 250-500 are usually much more available (but not necessary any lesser qualified as the P1000 individual...just less World titles). My best coach (in my opinion) charges 500 per session. The new assistant coaches, who are fully competent apprentices of our system following 6 months of hands-on training charge about P250 per session.

These rates are for people who want one-on-one training or the undivided attention of one of our staff. Regular members can consult for free with one of the coaches at any time they are not with a client.

#3 Elrik

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Posted 05 July 2006 - 09:19 PM

sa Fitness First charge sa akin ng Trainer ko 7700 for 12 sessions

#4 Olympus

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Posted 06 July 2006 - 10:09 AM

sa Fitness First charge sa akin ng Trainer ko 7700 for 12 sessions

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wow that's very expensive. How are your results so far?

#5 Google

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Posted 06 July 2006 - 10:41 AM

sa Fitness First charge sa akin ng Trainer ko 7700 for 12 sessions

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whoa! ang mahal ah....
imho. you don't really need one. all you need is a friend who can work out with you and guide you with the initial stages. after that, you would need the motivation to do it alone + readings sa internet or sa mga health magazines.

when i was just starting out, i only had a (trainer) guide with me for around 2 days. after that, its all reading and doing.

i doubt it if you can have the results you want in 12 sessions.

#6 kitzsen18

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Posted 05 September 2006 - 01:52 PM

ang mahal naman pl magsearch nalng ako s net ng mga manuals hehehehe..........PEACE

#7 Ironpinoy

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Posted 17 August 2007 - 12:42 AM

WHAT A CLIENT AND A TRAINER SHOULD KNOW
By Ernesto P. Cruz, Jr.
ISSA-CFT

There has been a lot of debate recently about whether a personal trainer should or should not discuss nutrition with their clients. Liability issues in health clubs, lawsuits brought against personal trainers due to them prescribing nutrition and supplements, and heightened attempts of nutritionists and dietitians to protect their profession has caused personal trainers and their certifying agencies to re-evaluate their stand on nutrition.

Read more http://www.ironpinoy...s/fitfacts3.php

#8 redax

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Posted 17 August 2007 - 06:39 AM

The hottest debate in the fitness section is actually which method is better for weight training, body building or fitness conditioning. Unlike your write up which stesses the importance of being a certified trainer, no trainer or fitness expert engaged in the argument bothered to mention anything about this, so its hard to determine their competence. Unfortunately, here in the Philippines, certification not only for fitness trainers, but also for sports coaches is not given as much weight as it is in developed countries. A lot of what is taught here is what is gained from experience, which is not entirely accurate all the time.

#9 Olympus

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Posted 19 August 2007 - 02:08 PM

The hottest debate in the fitness section is actually which method is better for weight training, body building or fitness conditioning. Unlike your write up which stesses the importance of being a certified trainer, no trainer or fitness expert engaged in the argument bothered to mention anything about this, so its hard to determine their competence. Unfortunately, here in the Philippines, certification not only for fitness trainers, but also for sports coaches is not given as much weight as it is in developed countries. A lot of what is taught here is what is gained from experience, which is not entirely accurate all the time.


In reality, there is no internationa governing body in terms of certifications.

Many of these certifications are but weekend seminars and some are just mostly theory.

many of the top strength coaches in Eastern europe are not certified yet have produced results countless tims, and results are more significant than any certification out there.

#10 redax

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Posted 19 August 2007 - 10:52 PM

I'm not talking about a certification that you attended a seminar or a conference which is what they usually show here in the Philippines. A certification in a developed country is proof that you passed an exam that shows your competence. Credentials will still play a big part in any profession. A trainer who passed a course in physical education would still be more credible than one who just gained knowledge through experience. There is so much information and research in sports and physical development now that there is a need to make your competence known. For tennis teaching professionals for example, you will not be taken seriously in developed countries if you are not a certified teaching professional of a credible organization like the US Professional Tennis Association, Professional Tennis Registry or the International Tennis Federation. Even with aerobic instructors, they have there own highly respected certification organizations in developed countries. Unfortunately, here, there are not that many certified professionals in the physical fitness industry so the clients have to rely on word of mouth or other such recommendations which will not be as accurate as more objective, accurate and professional assessments and evaluations.

#11 Olympus

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Posted 20 August 2007 - 10:37 AM

Strength training and tennis are two different things..

We always have to separate skill from strength and conditioning

The USA Weightlifting founder and president was in fact a Sociology major, yet he had tons of experience and helped found all these level certifications and accreditations

#12 redax

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Posted 20 August 2007 - 11:45 PM

Strength training and tennis are two different things..

We always have to separate skill from strength and conditioning

The USA Weightlifting founder and president was in fact a Sociology major, yet he had tons of experience and helped found all these level certifications and accreditations


Please mention his name so I can research his credentials. Its unusual for someone of his stature not to have any other credentials. Maybe he was originally a sociology major, but he could have undergone education and specialization in physical education, sports physiology or the like after he found out sociology wasn't for him.

#13 Olympus

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Posted 21 August 2007 - 10:22 AM

I'll get back to you on the USAW president since I can't quite remember it.

Aside from him, a lot of other great coaches aren't certified, Al Vermeil, who was the strength coach of the San Francisco 49ers when they won a superbowl in the 80s and the Michael Jordan era Chicago Bulls was only a PE major.

Dan John, who has won numerous highland games championships and is a sought after olympic weightlifting coach is a religious studies degree holder

Louie Simmons of the westside barbell club isn't certified as well

In reality, there is no internationally governing body of certification. In Europe, certifications aren't given that look.

Any coach in the US would k*ll to hire or consult a Russian or Bulgarian strength coach, and these guys don't have any certificates.

In the end, the gym determines whether or not they would recognize a certification.

As always, results will always outweigh any certification out there.

#14 redax

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Posted 21 August 2007 - 05:56 PM

That may be the case when you're referring solely to body building where its just size and proportion that matters, but when you start being physical fitness and conditioning trainers for athletes in different sports, you would have to learn a whole lot more than body building. In Dr. Donald A. Chu's Jumping into Plyometrics for example, the programs would depend on what sport the athletes are in and their weaknesses. Its not a one size fits all program. I guess maybe in a way, body building is more like boxing and taekwondo where a lot of old school methods are still in use. A lot of the exercises they perform have already been regarded as not safe way back during the fitness craze of the 80's.

#15 Eclipseguy

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Posted 21 August 2007 - 08:28 PM

That may be the case when you're referring solely to body building where its just size and proportion that matters, but when you start being physical fitness and conditioning trainers for athletes in different sports, you would have to learn a whole lot more than body building. In Dr. Donald A. Chu's Jumping into Plyometrics for example, the programs would depend on what sport the athletes are in and their weaknesses. Its not a one size fits all program. I guess maybe in a way, body building is more like boxing and taekwondo where a lot of old school methods are still in use. A lot of the exercises they perform have already been regarded as not safe way back during the fitness craze of the 80's.


Quite the opposite. Everyone Olympus mentioned is at the top of the list in the "who's who" of strength and conditioning. I'm wondering if you even read his post. If you don't know who Al Vermeil is, then you shouldn't be bringing up Dr. Chu, since what Dr. Chu teaches is useless and even dangerous without understanding what Coach Vermeil teaches. I have yet to meet a local athlete who is physically prepared for plyometrics. Everyone I've met locally complains of nothing but problems when they've undergone plyometrics in Metro-Manila. I have NEVER met anyone who actually underwent plyometrics with anything positive to say. "I think I saw a difference" is a placebo effect. I've trained several basketball players who could dunk after 3-4 weeks of Olympic lifts. Tony Dela Cruz of the Alaska Aces could dunk after TWO power clean sessions since he bridged an old mind-muscle connection that deteriorated without the performance of the O-lifts.

For the record, Olympus and I train dozens of basketball players, two of which were recently drafted in the PBA in the top 5. One of these two I coached while he was recovering from TB. The doctor gave me full blessing to do what I intended to do, and he had outstanding scores on all of his strength, agility, and conditioning tests. Now it's up to the skills coaches to teach him to use his massive and powerful frame....in short, teach him how to use his raw athletic talent in the timing of rebounds, court sense, and shot selection. The JRU Heavy Bombers came to us because of how their off-season PBL opponents from Henkel-Sista that we trained were able to give them such headaches. Now JRU has won their last 5 straight games and is the leading contender to the NCAA title. As far as anyone from Jose Rizal University can remember, the last time the team won 5 straight games was in the 70's, but even that's not certain.

We also train dozens of fighters from Fight Club and New Breed Academy. Fight Club, in particular, is so impressed that they are considering canceling the construction of their next branch and making our Shaw branch their new home.

We train tri-athletes with one, in particular, who is the fastest in her age group. She came to me because she had no luck in other gyms, but saw results immediately.

We train competitive swimmers and are endorsed by Coach Bert Lozada. I'd take his endorsement over the endorsement of ACE any day. The first two swimmers we coached have both earned full athletic scholarships from Mapua. A 3rd swimmer is looking at a full ride at DLSU. This track record is bringing us dozens of inquiries from parents whose children are in high school who also would like to earn an athletic scholarship.

We have also taken over the rehabilitation of several individuals from both severe and long-term back problems and heart surgery after they were released to us by their specialists. One of our members had a coronary bypass graft. He happens to be the best friend of the biggest investor in one of our rival gyms. Ironically he doesn't trust the trainers at his gym and his best friend is now trained by one of my guys.

Obviously we deal with tons of other special cases and just ordinary people who want to simply look and feel better.

And on and on...and we only have a handful of bodybuilders (as defined by how they describe themselves), and they all follow their own programs, perfectly happy to be left to their own devices, which is fine by us, since bodybuilding is not our focus.


So to our clients from all walks of life, professional teams, fighting schools, professional swimming academies, and even medical doctors, our experience is what counts the most. They trust experience and the results they've seen any day over a certification.



This is the same reason why our own in-house certification takes at least 6 months of practical observation and assistance and then another 6 months (at least) to be recognized and trusted to handle special cases.

And indeed there is not a "one size fits all program". That's why all are done by hand and every single program must be tailored around the strengths and weaknesses of the individual. Furthermore, only the most senior among us writes programs, especially now that we have so many special cases.

#16 Eclipseguy

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Posted 21 August 2007 - 08:55 PM

Please mention his name so I can research his credentials. Its unusual for someone of his stature not to have any other credentials. Maybe he was originally a sociology major, but he could have undergone education and specialization in physical education, sports physiology or the like after he found out sociology wasn't for him.


Harvey S. Newton

He has an MA in sociology and went on to found the NCSA and also coached the US Weightlifting team, a team that (ironically), never fared well against the Russians, Greeks, and now the Chinese. He has no further formal education in physical education if you research his own bio. Experience got him where he is today.

In short, he's one of the pioneers of the most "respected" of all of the certification bodies in the NCSA (CSCS), but that's relative with respect to it's impressiveness, since again, the USA never fared well in most sports that have to do with strength.

So I'd take the knowledge or experience of an old Eastern-bloc coach any day over the raw foundation of a CSCS.

I'm not bashing the CSCS (or other lesser certifications), but I am definitely saying that it's only a very BASIC beginning for those who have no experience in science or dealing with athletes. If you have a degree in sciences or have dealt extensively with athletes or special populations and have produced dramatic results, nobody will pay attention to your credentials. I know plenty of people who are certified but cannot produce results and have given up in the realm of athletic training. I also know of several individuals, besides the ones listed above who are not certified by those commercial certification bodies who charge several hundred DOLLARS per hour, and have a waiting list. Even in Manila I know of several very good trainers who have dozens of clients and charge Php800-1200 per session or are hired as consultants and also are not certified.

I'd venture that Eddie Torres and Mon Dubuque of Zest Gym, one of the most respected gyms in the country are not certified or if one of them ever was, that certification has long expired (since you have to pay to renew it), yet they have dozens of records and have trained their share of athletes over the years in multiple sports. I know that Eddie was a shot-putter in the past and Mon was a weightlifter, so their experience came from being athletes and then extensive research and testing. That's the only way to truly learn what works. Even in my case, I experimented on myself for years in the gym, even before I met my first coach. Even to this day I gather data to refine my most tried and true programs. I keep that data secret as do all of the best strength coaches. Sports is a VERY competitive industry. For example, if I gave the Letran Coach Louie Alas my program(s), I'd be shooting myself in the foot and our team, JRU would have a much harder time keeping their strength and conditioning edge.

This is, and always will be, the reason that certifications are only a START, and often they are a "map" that can lead you down the road that can lead people to disappointment, or even career-ending injury since you didn't know where to place the theory into practical application. This is the same reason why doctors must attend many years of residency, especially if they are surgeons. One of the oldest jokes in medicine has to do with doctors out of medical school performing surgery...and this is exactly why they must observe for years before they are allowed to go near a beating heart or even a new pair of silicon implants. Then there's carpenter apprentices....electrician apprentices (2-year minimum), and on and on....

#17 Eclipseguy

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Posted 21 August 2007 - 09:16 PM

I'm not talking about a certification that you attended a seminar or a conference which is what they usually show here in the Philippines. A certification in a developed country is proof that you passed an exam that shows your competence. Credentials will still play a big part in any profession. A trainer who passed a course in physical education would still be more credible than one who just gained knowledge through experience. There is so much information and research in sports and physical development now that there is a need to make your competence known. For tennis teaching professionals for example, you will not be taken seriously in developed countries if you are not a certified teaching professional of a credible organization like the US Professional Tennis Association, Professional Tennis Registry or the International Tennis Federation. Even with aerobic instructors, they have there own highly respected certification organizations in developed countries. Unfortunately, here, there are not that many certified professionals in the physical fitness industry so the clients have to rely on word of mouth or other such recommendations which will not be as accurate as more objective, accurate and professional assessments and evaluations.



This is not true unless, MAYBE, you are trying to get a job with the IOC in Boulder, Colorado...but even then they'll require a Ph.D in Physiology or Human Kinetics. The certified guys without the science background or experience are allowed to stretch out the athletes or maybe setup the hurdles on the track.

Bill Starr and Louie Simmons, between the two of them, have probably consulted with literally EVERY professional and NCAA Division I team in the USA. Neither are certified, and I know for a fact that Louie Simmons charges thousands of dollars per day for his consulting fees for said teams. It's why he maintains a private gym and only allows maybe 50 people to see the inside of his gym, even though there are probably 10,000 people that would mob the place if he announced Westside Barbell club as open to the public. And he could charge $10,000 per month (at the very least) to the line of pro-athletes that would train there in the off-season.

Certifications are mainly so gyms setup and run by non-athletes have some sort of idea who to hire. If you present your certification to the DePaul or Michigan State athletic department, they'll pat you on the head and you'll work as an apprentice, and probably for free. I know since I did exactly that and there were CSCS's who had been there for a year who were still working for free to gain the experience required to secure a job on that team or another team with a position opening.

It's no different than paying $200,000 to go to Harvard Medical school and then getting paid $20,000 per year as a resident in an ER. That $20,000 will barely cover the interest on the student loans, let alone your most basic needs. So even though you're getting paid 1/10th of your medical school education (before taxes), you are still FAR below the poverty level. But that's the price of experience.

It's painful for most people to accept, but one way or another, you must pay your dues through time served to gain experience.

#18 Olympus

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Posted 21 August 2007 - 10:15 PM

Isn't harvey Newton the same guy who authored "Explosive Lifting for Sports"? One of the books we initially had apprentices read roughly a year ago?

#19 Olympus

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Posted 21 August 2007 - 10:22 PM

Here's the bio of Coach Harvey Newton

Harvey Newton opened his first issue of Strength & Health “a long time ago,” during the heyday of American weightlifting, and was immediately hooked on the world’s most powerful sport. From the beginning he has been a strong leader at all levels in weightlifting and strength training as an athlete, coach, administrator, and educator. Harvey competed in weightlifting for 17 years, achieving modest results as a local and regional lifter.


While competing and coaching at the University of Central Florida, where he obtained his bachelor’s degree in psychology, Coach Newton expanded his sphere of influence with sport-specific clinics and training camps for athletes and coaches of dozens of sports. Later, at the University of Colorado (Colorado Springs) Newton obtained his master’s in sociology, with an emphasis on coaches’ education.

Coach Newton’s first international coaching assignment came while he was still active as an athlete. Coaching weightlifting has taken him to all corners of the globe and culminated with his head coach position for the USA Olympic Weightlifting Team in 1984. He was USA Weightlifting’s first national coach (1981-84) and served as that group’s executive director (1982-88). Coach Newton is one of the original five US coaches to receive the coveted Senior International Coach status.

For the past 30 years Coach Newton has influenced countless individuals and teams with his knowledge of weightlifting and strength training. He has been the featured lecturer on several International Olympic Committee Solidarity courses and has consulted at all levels on athlete and coach education and development, in addition to organizing and conducting major athletic events. During the 1996, 2000, and 2004 Olympic Games, Harvey Newton was a key part of the NBC-Sports weightlifting team.

Coach Newton authored the popular Explosive Lifting for Sports book and DVD for Human Kinetics. Additionally he assists Dartfish, the leader in human motion analysis, on numerous projects, including his cooperative development of the DVD, Weightlifting: Beyond the Basics. His popular Strength Training for Cyclists videotape series has recently been updated and is now available as a DVD.

Coach Newton worked extensively with the late Ed Burke, PhD on several cycling educational publications and projects. He has co-authored or contributed to numerous books and publications on cycling. A Level 2 USA Cycling coach, Harvey was the strength training advisor to USA Cycling and continues to assist USAC in their efforts at educating athletes and coaches.

Newton is a member of the editorial board of the International Journal of Sports Science and Coaching and the Annual Review of Golf Coaching.

Newton Sports was created in 1989 to assist those from all walks of life cut through much of the contradictory and sometimes confusing information on the topic of weightlifting and strength training. He’s a straight shooter, providing solid and easy-to-understand details on safe and proper resistance training methods. He is often quoted in popular media on a wide range of topics and has served as an expert in related legal cases.

Harvey Newton and Newton Sports are dedicated to helping others achieve success in the weightroom and in life. These days Coach Newton is found either in Ormond Beach, FL or on Maui, HI. He remains active with lifting, cycling, paddling surfskis, coaching, and writing.

#20 id6230

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Posted 22 August 2007 - 06:59 AM

WHAT A CLIENT AND A TRAINER SHOULD KNOW
By Ernesto P. Cruz, Jr.
ISSA-CFT

There has been a lot of debate recently about whether a personal trainer should or should not discuss nutrition with their clients. Liability issues in health clubs, lawsuits brought against personal trainers due to them prescribing nutrition and supplements, and heightened attempts of nutritionists and dietitians to protect their profession has caused personal trainers and their certifying agencies to re-evaluate their stand on nutrition.

Read more http://www.ironpinoy...s/fitfacts3.php


The trainer is the thinker; the client is the doer. However, the clients becomes doer and thinker too. The person who pays is the person in control.




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