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Philippine Science High Schools


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#1 yody

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Posted 10 July 2013 - 08:06 AM

Mga GM Masters graduates ng PSci of kung me mga anak o kakilala na nag-aaral dito,

Pa-share pls. any info:

1. aside from the main campus, saan iba campus ang ok
2. advantages& disadvantages of being a student of a graduate
3. ano mga dark sides or warnings kung dun papasok anak mo

#2 Danielle

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Posted 10 July 2013 - 09:03 AM

A to Qs:


1) i believe all PSci campuses are following the standard expected of them. my thoughts: choose the campus nearest to your home or to a place where your child can go home to. avoid leaving his fate in the dormitory.


2) the key is parental guidance. the child may be intelligent and determined, but a 12 or 13-yr old child still needs a lot of guidance and values formation. in my time, there were 3 who got pregnant, ages 13, 14 and 16.


3) the pressure, competition and expectations inside and outside the campus imprison the "child" in every student there. this explains why there are a lot of PSci graduates who get totally distracted in college. the overwhelming freedom in college stirs that "forgotten child" to break free and run loose.


BUT


with proper parental guidance, right motivation and solid support system, nothing beats PSci in giving the best quality in education and network.




God bless your child.
God bless you, dear parent.

#3 floppydrive

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Posted 10 July 2013 - 10:56 AM

Mga GM Masters graduates ng PSci of kung me mga anak o kakilala na nag-aaral dito,

Pa-share pls. any info:

1. aside from the main campus, saan iba campus ang ok
2. advantages& disadvantages of being a student of a graduate
3. ano mga dark sides or warnings kung dun papasok anak mo



1. As Danielle mentioned, choose one close to your home, or close to where there are relatives who can assist/help the kid. Curriculum is the same between campuses. The only difference is that the top 240 who passed the entrance exam get to qualify for the main campus.

2. The graduate will have skills to analyze problems and think fast. The curriculum is very fast paced and the load is heavy in Math & Sciences. Imagine finishing HS math and all HS science subjects (Biology, Physics, Chemistry) even before finishing 3rd year HS (with the pre-K+12 curriculum). With the revisions being done in light of K+12, the graduate would have completed 1st and maybe up to 2nd yr college math & science subjects. The school is still working on the year 11 & 12 curriculum as of now and have not formally announce the design. Graduates are highly competitive and would most likely end up in the top of their profession. This will be good for networking in the future. You'll be in good company in UP. 30% of the UP College of Engineering freshmen last year or last-last year came from PSHS.

3. Downside:

With the advent of special review centers today, the child may ace the entrance test but is not actually prepared for the actual study load. There are plenty of students struggling even in 1st & 2nd year. Yung iba nagppa-tutor na ng 1st year.

Pressure is high to study. Some have difficulty coping. Watch "Pisay the Movie" to get a feel of the pressures of studying in this school.

Upon entering college, some graduates fall into a lull and don't take their studies seriously. They become complacent during 1st year because they've already taken the subject before. Some drop out of college or transfer because of this.

There are rare cases of students/graduates having psychological breakdowns.


4. Dark Side / warning signs

Be prepared to STUDY HARD with the best students in the country. Some students feel they are invincible and the top of their grade school, but suddenly feel inadequate or begin to have insecurities when they see lots of other students who are better than them. The pressure is high. There are no repetitions of grade levels. If you fail, you're kicked out.

Make sure the child is prepared to study hard, think fast and have the patience and humility to take the work load.

The dorms have their own culture which may add pressure on the child. Best to choose a campus where the child can go home to family or a close relative.

Child has to be guided with etiquette, manners, ethics, and how to socialize. If the family is religious, the child will also need guidance here.



In the end, it is worth all the effort to study in this school. It's tough to enter & hard to graduate, but the benefits are well worth it. Critical/analytical thinking, data analysis, study habits are just some of the things the graduate will have for the rest of his/her life.



Hope this helps

#4 GT888

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Posted 10 July 2013 - 12:50 PM

1. As Danielle mentioned, choose one close to your home, or close to where there are relatives who can assist/help the kid. Curriculum is the same between campuses. The only difference is that the top 240 who passed the entrance exam get to qualify for the main campus.

2. The graduate will have skills to analyze problems and think fast. The curriculum is very fast paced and the load is heavy in Math & Sciences. Imagine finishing HS math and all HS science subjects (Biology, Physics, Chemistry) even before finishing 3rd year HS (with the pre-K+12 curriculum). With the revisions being done in light of K+12, the graduate would have completed 1st and maybe up to 2nd yr college math & science subjects. The school is still working on the year 11 & 12 curriculum as of now and have not formally announce the design. Graduates are highly competitive and would most likely end up in the top of their profession. This will be good for networking in the future. You'll be in good company in UP. 30% of the UP College of Engineering freshmen last year or last-last year came from PSHS.

3. Downside:

With the advent of special review centers today, the child may ace the entrance test but is not actually prepared for the actual study load. There are plenty of students struggling even in 1st & 2nd year. Yung iba nagppa-tutor na ng 1st year.

Pressure is high to study. Some have difficulty coping. Watch "Pisay the Movie" to get a feel of the pressures of studying in this school.

Upon entering college, some graduates fall into a lull and don't take their studies seriously. They become complacent during 1st year because they've already taken the subject before. Some drop out of college or transfer because of this.

There are rare cases of students/graduates having psychological breakdowns.


4. Dark Side / warning signs

Be prepared to STUDY HARD with the best students in the country. Some students feel they are invincible and the top of their grade school, but suddenly feel inadequate or begin to have insecurities when they see lots of other students who are better than them. The pressure is high. There are no repetitions of grade levels. If you fail, you're kicked out.

Make sure the child is prepared to study hard, think fast and have the patience and humility to take the work load.

The dorms have their own culture which may add pressure on the child. Best to choose a campus where the child can go home to family or a close relative.

Child has to be guided with etiquette, manners, ethics, and how to socialize. If the family is religious, the child will also need guidance here.



In the end, it is worth all the effort to study in this school. It's tough to enter & hard to graduate, but the benefits are well worth it. Critical/analytical thinking, data analysis, study habits are just some of the things the graduate will have for the rest of his/her life.



Hope this helps



I am a graduate of Philippine Science - Batch (witheld)

My two cents worth...

I finished grade school in a chinese school in San Juan and moved to Philippine Science.

My parents planned our education quite well so good for you.

We are all UP grads and alumni of Philippine Science. My other sister and brother went to UP IS.

Anyways - its a great school if you want your kid to be in an Engineer, Doctor or to be in some other technical courses. We come from a family of Doctors and Engineers so we were brought up with that knowledge.

The pace is very fast and there is a lot of competition. During my time, there were 5 contenders to be valedictorian and it was so political. You develop life long friends and respect each other for their strengths and intelligence.
We had an IQ test and our average IQ was 134 i think. The competition would be so intense that i saw some classmates demand of perfection in everything they do. Then there are those that fail because of the pressure of not being on top as most of us figure that we were not the smartest kids. Our valedictorian was so damn smart that she almost got perfect scores in all our math subjects from freshman to senior year. Her record i understand has not been surpassed yet.

We were all nerds but mind you it wasnt far from the real UP culture. which means as long as you pass. You can do anything.

All of us graduated and completed all requirements. Our teachers would say that we could easily jump into second year in college with all our science and math subjects.

At the University, I took INTARMED but after a year I decided to shift because on my third year i just didnt want to be a doctor. So i shifted to Engineering and took EE.

The problem with Philippine Science or the UP system is that it accepts too many students that can afford to pay tuition in an exclusive school. During our home coming i saw many chauffered students. Don't get me wrong, everybody deserves to be in UP but if a family can afford sending thier children to a good exclusive school then they are sort of killing the chances of a poor scholar from the provinces.

If your child is above her/his maturity age...and is aware, then by all means. Go! but if your child is intelligent but lacks the EQ....then there might be some risk. E.G. i had a good support system because my sister was there for me and the teachers knew my family. But to those that were parent dependent and weak....they were the ones who failed in all or some aspects of having a normal HS life.

Philippine Science Alumni's always talk about how fast we matured and the system that molded our educational consciousness.

If your kid is smart and well balanced in all aspects of maturity. Then Go!

Good Luck to your kid....

#5 Malignant

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Posted 10 July 2013 - 06:14 PM

Just to add my two cent's worth...

I'm also a certified Pisay kotik.

First of all, there a lot of campuses (campi?) to choose from, depending on your location.

I think there are campuses in Ilocos, Pampanga, Ilo-ilo and Mindanao aside from the main one in Agham. Thus, your kid may now have a lot more chances to get into the Pisay system.

Pisay education is still the best, provided that your kid could handle the 1st 2 years there. During that time, unless he/she is truly a wonderkid, he would be struggling to adapt to the fact that in this environment, he is but normal or worse, maybe even left behind. That is just academics though. Finding your niche in the pisay hierarchy is another challenge. Though for both challenges, the next years are so much easier (the pressure will bond you and your batchmates as tight as can be).

I agree with the previous posters, if your kid is not emotionally ready to handle the pressure, even his IQ would not be able to compensate for the stress in studying in such an environment. This may result in more isolation and make him/her susceptible to bullying. I have seen it happen year after year during my time there.


I guess, however, that today's pisay is more, welcoming..


Due to the advent of a lot more campus (in my day there was only one-the main one), the environment and the students have been pushed more and more to the norm.
Gone are the days when you have a wonderkid from the Ilocos, a fashionable muslim princess, sons of local politicos, the daughter of a vegetable vendor from Roxas City, all of whom were imbued with a certain hubris, as they were the best of the best, the top 240 primary school graduates from a pool of the top 10% graduates nationwide. Those divergent backgrounds increased isolation and depression but also gave rise to the unlikeliest and most enduring friendships. Consequently, in today's setup, your kid may have better chances to adapt and perform well in Pisay.



As to getting in, it is easier now as there are a lot more slots (spread across the campuses) open. Review Centers almost always give a certain advantage (ironically the pioneer review center of them all, employed part time Pisay grads as its first tutors-the ones who identified and predicted the patterns of questioning). Some of my batchmates who went back to teach at Pisay identified the proliferation of "review centers" as skewing "the curve." Thus, you do not get best minds anymore, rather, the best prepared (who have adequate funds) above-average student may easily get in. In some quarters, this has dulled the luster of a Pisay "graduate" (Human Resources Managers I've spoken to have attested to this, and consequently, later graduates do not easily impress them unlike before). This may be true, but in my mind, the education and curriculum still stand out, which will best prepare your child in today's technocentric world.


At this stage though, it is useless to worry after things you raised. Attending Pisay is not a matter of just choosing to go there. Prepare your kid as best as possible to pass the series of examinations. But don't pressure him to pass it. I have several friends who are emotionally scarred as they disappointed their parents in not passing the exams. Only after your kid passes the exam would your concerns be material. And only then would it be a matter of choice between pros and cons.


Hope this helps.


Best of luck to your kid.

#6 GT888

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 11:56 AM

I am glad to see many schoolmates here....

I am UP INTARMED but did not finish. moved to UP EE

Member UP Wrestling Team.

Taught Calculus after graduating.

#7 GT888

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 12:09 PM

Just to add my two cent's worth...

I'm also a certified Pisay kotik.

First of all, there a lot of campuses (campi?) to choose from, depending on your location.

I think there are campuses in Ilocos, Pampanga, Ilo-ilo and Mindanao aside from the main one in Agham. Thus, your kid may now have a lot more chances to get into the Pisay system.

Pisay education is still the best, provided that your kid could handle the 1st 2 years there. During that time, unless he/she is truly a wonderkid, he would be struggling to adapt to the fact that in this environment, he is but normal or worse, maybe even left behind. That is just academics though. Finding your niche in the pisay hierarchy is another challenge. Though for both challenges, the next years are so much easier (the pressure will bond you and your batchmates as tight as can be).

I agree with the previous posters, if your kid is not emotionally ready to handle the pressure, even his IQ would not be able to compensate for the stress in studying in such an environment. This may result in more isolation and make him/her susceptible to bullying. I have seen it happen year after year during my time there.

I guess, however, that today's pisay is more, welcoming..

Due to the advent of a lot more campus (in my day there was only one-the main one), the environment and the students have been pushed more and more to the norm.
Gone are the days when you have a wonderkid from the Ilocos, a fashionable muslim princess, sons of local politicos, the daughter of a vegetable vendor from Roxas City, all of whom were imbued with a certain hubris, as they were the best of the best, the top 240 primary school graduates from a pool of the top 10% graduates nationwide. Those divergent backgrounds increased isolation and depression but also gave rise to the unlikeliest and most enduring friendships. Consequently, in today's setup, your kid may have better chances to adapt and perform well in Pisay.


As to getting in, it is easier now as there are a lot more slots (spread across the campuses) open. Review Centers almost always give a certain advantage (ironically the pioneer review center of them all, employed part time Pisay grads as its first tutors-the ones who identified and predicted the patterns of questioning). Some of my batchmates who went back to teach at Pisay identified the proliferation of "review centers" as skewing "the curve." Thus, you do not get best minds anymore, rather, the best prepared (who have adequate funds) above-average student may easily get in. In some quarters, this has dulled the luster of a Pisay "graduate" (Human Resources Managers I've spoken to have attested to this, and consequently, later graduates do not easily impress them unlike before). This may be true, but in my mind, the education and curriculum still stand out, which will best prepare your child in today's technocentric world.

At this stage though, it is useless to worry after things you raised. Attending Pisay is not a matter of just choosing to go there. Prepare your kid as best as possible to pass the series of examinations. But don't pressure him to pass it. I have several friends who are emotionally scarred as they disappointed their parents in not passing the exams. Only after your kid passes the exam would your concerns be material. And only then would it be a matter of choice between pros and cons.

Hope this helps.

Best of luck to your kid.


Hey Malignant -

I remember the pressure on me, as i was the youngest sibling.

Review Centers - Man, we did not have the luxury of having one. I remember being tutored by my older brother and they asked really above - elementary questions.

I guess, what set us apart compared to Gen Y and this new emerging Me generation is that they are not Bookies.

I wonder if these kids have completed reading the classics or have ONLY read Harry Potter books or those Vampire Books.

What really helped me was that my parents insisted that I read the following compilations / volumes before i reached grade six.

These were :

Book of Knowledge
Encyclopedia Brittanica
TIME Science
Algebra 1 and 2

I cant even read more than 2 hours using my kindle and Ipad.

#8 Malignant

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 01:42 PM

Hi GT88,

Nice meeting you here, bro.

Ya. Those were the days.

From where I'm from, we can only watch Channel 2. Lol. So we had to amuse ourselves with books, books and more books.I had a classmate who had to cross the sea (swimming) to get to his elementary school in the Visayas each day. He graduated valedictorian in his school and attended PSHS (no wonder he was so buffed when he arrived) later on. Now a top notch engineer working for the best software company.

Ditto. Youngest among our brood. 2 of my elder siblings also went PSHS, and all went to UP. Pressure was on me too.

Finished an IT course due to the PSHS contract (as I was told later, it wasn't voided by the CA back then) under, for the most part, DOST scholarship then went on to study and practice law (like a lot of Pisay graduates).

Para hindi OT:

More Pros:
Back then, we had:
Best Education, Free tuition, Monthly Stipends (Full scholarship then was P1,800-you will get deductions if you are late or absent from class-the best incentive), for comparison the DOST scholarship-was P800 a month at UP, you will be assigned books the whole year (no need to buy them), for 2 years we also had annual clothing allowance, dormitory (deducted from stipends), classmates from all walks of life (from the most private of private schools and public schools in places not appearing in any map) and all regions of the Philippines (really a microcosm of Philippine Society-all you had in common was you were supposedly the "brightest" of your grade school level) and the perpetual title of "science scholar".

It was common that a lot of students there could boast that there parents never shelled out a dime for their education from elementary (graduated top of their class), high school and college.

Average NSAT rating was 99+ for our batch. If you got a 99, you will be termed (forever-but in jest) "lesser being". Our batch had a 95% UP passing rate. In the words of Prof Basas (she retired before our time though): "Presumptively, you are the cream of the cream of the crop." You just have to prove it to them. LOL.

HR Managers (Back then-see previous posts) would take a second look at you if you're from Pisay no matter how battered your grades in college were.

Cons:

Pressure, pressure, pressure and the realization that in this crop of gifted students, you are but normal after all. A lot will carry this supreme confidence in college, as most will find the subjects already taken up during their years in Pisay. A lot of them will later realize too late that their non Pisay batchmates in college have caught up to them by the 3rd year (Eng'g) and as they are used to taking it easy, will be left behind, or miserably fail.

#9 Malignant

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 03:41 PM

By the way, though I mentioned it awhile back, another drawback is any student entering the institution would have (guaranteed by his parents or guardian) to commit to take at the tertiary level, only "allowable" courses covered by the pure "sciences" (Physics, Biology, Mathematics) and applied sciences (Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Engineering etc.). Otherwise, the parents or guardian would have to pay a sizable amount representing the tuition, stipends and other expenses that the state lavished on the student while he attended the PSHS.

In earlier times, I think it was the student who was the primary party to the contract with the school. But I was told that the procedure was changed to one where the parents assumed the liability by guaranteeing the student's commitment, due to a case (I still haven't seen this case though) where the Courts supposedly voided the contract signed by a PSHS student (when they went after him after he changed courses), who was still a minor at the time.

So, best of luck there.

#10 JustSmile=)

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 07:31 PM

I am also a graduate of one of the Science High Schools, in Paranaque to be specific..

Pros:

You'll learn fast. Science high schools have a "sink or swim" philosophy. If you cannot hang with them, definitely you'll be out come next year. You also have to maintain a certain grade average.

College will be a walk in the park. You're already used to constant pressure. You'll have this aura that whatever they put you through will not be comparable to your difficulties in high school.

You will learn to persevere. I think that's self explanatory.

Academic and Life maturity will be achieved early. Academic maturity, it's obvious due to the pressure. Life maturity, imagine at high school you have to see some of your closest friends find another school because they cannot make the expected average. As a child that will be hard to swallow. We were 30 students in first year but only 12 graduated.


Cons:

Your childhood will be taken from you fast. Science High Schools are no joke. Imagine at first year, a 13 year old child will have no time to play because of the pressure both from the teachers and your peers. I have this experience wherein in a quiz I got 48/50 questions right and I still I felt bad because out of 30 students 27 got perfect and two got 49/50.

Constant bullying. Well at least in Paranaque, the Science High School is located within the Main Municipal high school wherein there are 50+ sections per year probably consisting of 80+ students per section. To top that, we are the only ones wearing the blue khakis, essentially making that the target for those 20-year old high school students.

Edited by G_sKiLLz, 11 July 2013 - 07:31 PM.


#11 vgbond

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Posted 21 August 2015 - 05:35 PM

1. Since you will see a lot of Pisay (main campus) and MaSci (Manila) graduates when you enter the

University of the Philippines (Manila or Diliman), it is safe to say that Manila Science High School is a good institution.

 

2. The Philippine Science High School curriculum is very similar to the Bs Biology course in UP (at least, during my

generation), so it will be easier to graduate with honors in that course. It also provides a lot of background knowledge

if ever you pursue other science college course other that Biology.

 

3. During my time, common yung accounts of "mang-dedekwat" (klepto) sa Pisay. Nawala yung Airmax ko nung time na yun.

I'm not aware of the current issues.



#12 omghaxmanz

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Posted 04 July 2016 - 10:19 AM

Nice to see so many PSci people in MTC. Their points are very valid.

Intense math and science training - felt like college was just PSci plus a little more depth.

Pride ng school ang 100% UPCAT pass rate.

Tama na EQ nga ang naiiwan minsan..

#13 -DELETED-

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Posted 04 July 2016 - 12:12 PM

1. aside from the main campus, saan iba campus ang ok

 - Nearest to you is the best. But I only know pisay.

 

2. advantages& disadvantages of being a student of a graduate

- Competitive. Halos lahat ng kakilala kong graduates hindi common ang courses na kinuha. Mostly lahat narin successful. Even yung college schools nila hindi sila nahirapan pumasok. May allowances din sila so maliit gastos mo sa pag papaaral. Disadvantage ng Pisay is may mga NPA before but did no harm naman.
3. ano mga dark sides or warnings kung dun papasok anak mo 

- Sa pisay kasi pedeng mag dorm o stay in before. So hindi mo mababantayan anak mo 100% but you can still guide him from afar although I don't know if it will suffice. 



#14 Vocare Ad Regnum

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Posted 08 July 2016 - 05:02 PM

 A lot will carry this supreme confidence in college, as most will find the subjects already taken up during their years in Pisay. A lot of them will later realize too late that their non Pisay batchmates in college have caught up to them by the 3rd year (Eng'g) and as they are used to taking it easy, will be left behind, or miserably fail.

 

Guilty here!!!






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