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#1 angel_by_day

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Posted 02 May 2009 - 06:36 PM

for everyone ---

Swine influenza is a highly contagious respiratory disease of pigs caused by one of several swine influenza A viruses. Outbreaks are common in pigs year-round, but infection in humans historically is a result of close contact with infected animals. This current virus is a novel influenza A virus, more properly termed a new subtype of influenza A (H1N1) that was not previously detected in swine or humans. More important is that this new strain appears to be spread by human-to-human transmission.

It is likely that most people, particularly those who do not have regular contact with pigs, do not have any immunity to swine influenza viruses. Thus the concern is that if efficient human-to-human transmission is established, a pandemic is possible.

Government and public health officials are monitoring this situation worldwide to assess the threat from swine flu and to provide guidance to healthcare professionals and the public. Because the situation is changing rapidly, it is important to check regularly for changes in recommendations as new information becomes available.

This article is based on guidance and resources available from both the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO); they have been summarized here with the objective of offering practicing clinicians a one-stop resource for clinical practice concerns related to swine flu.

What Is the Clinical Presentation of Swine Flu?
Persons infected with swine flu may appear similar to those with seasonal influenza, presenting with symptoms of acute respiratory illness. Symptoms include at least 2 of the following:

Rhinorrhea or nasal congestion;
Sore throat;
Cough; and
Fever.
In addition, persons with swine flu may have other typical symptoms of influenza, including body aches, headache, chills, fatigue, and possibly diarrhea and vomiting.

Who Is Most at Risk for Swine Flu?
The CDC recommends that clinicians particularly consider the possibility of swine influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in patients with fevers and respiratory symptoms who:

Live in areas in the United States with confirmed human cases of swine influenza A (H1N1) virus infection. (To find the most up-to-date information on areas with confirmed swine influenza cases, go to http://www.cdc.gov/swineflu/index.htm)
Traveled recently to Mexico or were in contact with persons who had febrile respiratory illness and were in areas of the United States with confirmed swine influenza cases or Mexico in the 7 days preceding illness onset.
In addition, a person with an acute respiratory illness who has a recent history of contact with an animal with confirmed swine influenza should also be suspected (http://www.cdc.gov/s...mmendations.htm).

What Is the Range of Illness Severity Seen With Swine Flu?
Many cases of swine flu may be mild or even asymptomatic. In the past, cases were identified by chance as part of regular seasonal influenza surveillance. Most of the recent cases seen in the United States thus far have been mild as well. However, in Mexico, many patients' illnesses have been much more severe, have presented in young adults, and have included pneumonia, respiratory failure, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Illness-related fatalities have been recorded in Mexico. At this time, it is not clear why such differences in illness severity have been seen. Early in epidemics it is difficult to gauge severity because the overall denominator of people infected is unknown.

How Should Swine Flu Be Diagnosed?
Preferred specimens. If swine flu is suspected, clinicians should obtain a respiratory specimen for analysis. In an ideal situation, the best method is via nasal pharyngeal aspirate or nasal wash aspirate into viral culture media; however, some experts are recommending the use of Dacron nasal swabs to decrease aerosolization of the virus. If these specimens cannot be collected, a combined nasal swab with an oropharyngeal swab is also acceptable and will be feasible in most settings. (Ideally, swab specimens should be collected using swabs with a synthetic tip and an aluminum or plastic shaft. Swabs with cotton tips and wooden shafts are not recommended. Specimens collected with swabs made of calcium alginate are not acceptable.)

The specimen should be placed in a 4°C refrigerator (not a freezer) or immediately placed on ice or cold packs for transport to the laboratory. Once collected, make contact with the state or local health department to facilitate transport and timely diagnosis at a state public health laboratory.

Recommended tests. The CDC currently recommends "real-time RT-PCR for influenza A, B, H1, H3 conducted at a State Health Department Laboratory. Currently, swine influenza A (H1N1) virus will test positive for influenza A and negative for H1 and H3 by real-time RT-PCR. If reactivity of real-time RT-PCR for influenza A is strong (e.g., Ct ≤ 30) it is more suggestive of a novel influenza A virus." Confirmation as swine influenza A (H1N1) virus is now performed at the CDC but may be available in state public health laboratories soon.

Rapid influenza testing. Rapid testing for swine flu likely is similar to that for seasonal flu, meaning that sensitivities range between 50% and 70% of cases (no better than using fever and cough as a marker in a patient during influenza season), depending on the manufacturer. Therefore, negative rapid tests should not indicate a lack of influenza. (For general guidance on rapid influenza testing, see http://www.cdc.gov/f...s/rapidlab.htm)

Rapid tests can distinguish between influenza A and B viruses. A patient with a positive rapid test for influenza A may meet criteria for a probable case of swine flu, but again, a negative rapid test could be a false negative and should not be assumed a final diagnostic test for swine influenza infection.

Other tests. Immunofluorescence (DFA or IFA) tests can distinguish between influenza A and B viruses. A patient who is positive for influenza A by immunofluorescence may meet criteria for a probable case of swine influenza. However, a negative immunofluorescence could be a false negative and should not be assumed a final diagnostic test for swine influenza infection.

Isolation of swine influenza A (H1N1) virus by viral culture is also diagnostic of infection but may not yield timely results for clinical management. A negative viral culture does not exclude infection with swine influenza A (H1N1) virus.

To stay up-to-date on the latest recommendations for testing, check regularly at: http://www.cdc.gov/s...ncollection.htm

How Can Swine Flu Be Treated?
According to the CDC, swine influenza A (H1N1) is susceptible to the neuraminidase inhibitor antiviral medications zanamivir and oseltamivir. It is resistant to amantadine and rimantadine (http://www.cdc.gov/s...mmendations.htm). Treatment recommendations are as follows:

Suspected cases: Treat with zanamivir alone or with a combination of oseltamivir and either amantadine or rimantadine as soon as possible after the onset of symptoms and for a duration of 5 days.
Confirmed cases: Zanamivir or oseltamivir should be administered for 5 days.
Pregnant women: Antiviral medications are in Pregnancy Category C, so they should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit outweighs the potential risk to the embryo or fetus.
Children younger than 1 year: Because infants typically have high rates of morbidity and mortality from influenza, infants with swine influenza A (H1N1) infections may benefit from treatment with oseltamivir.
Detailed guidance on antiviral treatment for swine flu may be found here: http://www.cdc.gov/s...mmendations.htm

Should Antiviral Chemoprophylaxis Be Considered for Specific Populations?
Chemoprophylaxis is recommended for 7 days after the last known exposure to a confirmed case of swine influenza A (H1N1) virus. See http://www.cdc.gov/f...table.htm#table for dosing and schedules. The CDC recommends that the following populations receive chemoprophylaxis:

Household close contacts of a confirmed or suspected case who are at high risk for complications of influenza (persons with certain chronic medical conditions, elderly).
School children who are at high risk for complications of influenza (persons with certain chronic medical conditions) who have had close contact (face-to-face) with a confirmed or suspected case.
Travelers to Mexico who are at high risk for complications of influenza (persons with certain chronic medical conditions, elderly).
Border workers (Mexico) who are at high risk for complications of influenza (persons with certain chronic medical conditions, elderly).
Healthcare workers or public health workers who have had unprotected close contact with a person with confirmed swine influenza A (H1N1) virus infection during the infectious period. (Detailed guidance on this topic is available at http://www.cdc.gov/s...mendations.htm)
For How Long Is Swine Flu Contagious?
Persons with swine flu are considered infectious for 1 day before onset of the illness to 7 days after the onset.

What Infection-Control Precautions Should Be Taken in Healthcare Settings?
Patients who have a suspected or confirmed case of swine flu and who need to be hospitalized should be placed in a single-patient room with the door kept closed. The patient should wear a mask when outside the room. Standard, droplet, and contact precautions should be implemented and maintained by healthcare professionals for 7 days after the illness onset or until symptoms have resolved (http://www.cdc.gov/s...ion_control.htm).

The author wishes to thank Paul G. Auwaerter, MD, MBA, Clinical Director in the Division of Infectious Diseases at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland, and Rick Kulkarni, MD, Vice President/Medical Director of Medscape and Editor-in-Chief of eMedicine, for review of this article.

[ CLOSE WINDOW ]
[CLOSE WINDOW]
Authors and Disclosures
As an organization accredited by the ACCME, Medscape, LLC requires everyone who is in a position to control the content of an education activity to disclose all relevant financial relationships with any commercial interest. The ACCME defines "relevant financial relationships" as financial relationships in any amount, occurring within the past 12 months, including financial relationships of a spouse or life partner, that could create a conflict of interest.

Medscape, LLC encourages Authors to identify investigational products or off-label uses of products regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration, at first mention and where appropriate in the content.

Author(s)
Susan Yox, RN, EdD
Director, Editorial Content, Medscape

#2 peterparker

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Posted 02 May 2009 - 08:44 PM

just gonna add some additional info to clear up some misconceptions about the "Swine Flu" virus...

The "Swine Flu" virus is an apparent reassortment of four strains of influenza A virus subtype H1N1. Analysis at the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) identified the four component strains as one endemic in humans, one endemic in birds, and two endemic in pigs (swine). One swine strain was widespread in the United States, the other in Eurasia. Although called swine flu due to it predominantly containing swine strains, the World Organisation for Animal Health have proposed the name North American influenza because this new strain in its entirety has not been found in swine (pigs).

Some authorities object to calling the flu outbreak "swine flu". U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack expressed concerns that this would lead to the misconception that pork is unsafe for consumption. Israeli deputy health minister Yaakov Litzman proposed the name "Mexican flu" because Muslims and Jews consider pork to be unclean, but the Israeli government retracted this proposal following Mexican complaints. Although the South Korean Ministry for Food, Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries asked the press to use the term “Mexican Virus”, most of South Korean press and people prefer to use SI (short for Swine Influenza). Taiwanese authorities suggested the names “H1N1 flu” or “new flu”, which most local media now use. The World Organization for Animal Health has proposed the name "North American influenza". The European Commission uses the term "novel flu virus".

The WHO announced they would refer to the new influenza virus as influenza A(H1N1) or "Influenza A (H1N1) virus, human" as opposed to "swine flu", to avoid suggesting pork products carried a risk of causing infection. They confirmed that you cannot contract Influenza A (H1N1) by eating any properly cooked pork products.




:mtc:

#3 peterparker

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 09:55 AM

Top 5 Swine Flu Dont`s

1. Don't Rush to the ER
With the cable news networks reporting nonstop on swine flu, it feels like the disease is lurking everywhere, and that your slightest sniffle is a sign that you've contracted the virus. That would explain why people with no outward symptoms of illness are flooding emergency rooms in swine flu–affected areas, afraid that they might be sick. That's a really bad idea.

First of all, having to examine people who aren't really sick only stresses the already strained resources of hospitals that are trying to prepare for a pandemic. Plus, going to an emergency room unnecessarily may even pose a slight risk to you. In past outbreaks, including SARS in 2003, hospitals were actually loci of infections — all those sick people in close proximity — and the same could be true of swine flu.

If you actually have flu-like symptoms — a fever above 100° F, headache, sore throat, body aches, chills or fatigue — and you live in an area where there have been confirmed swine flu cases, by all means report to your doctor. Otherwise, leave the hospital to the sick people.


2. Don't Be Afraid to Eat Pork
the CDC announced that swine flu would no longer be referred to as swine flu, but as the "2009 H1N1 flu." It's less catchy, but more accurate. For one thing, there is no evidence that this virus makes pigs really sick. And the H1N1 virus actually contains genes from swine, avian and human flus. The virus also cannot be spread through pork products — you can't contract swine flu by eating bacon, hot dogs or anything else that was once a pig. Nor will culling pigs, as authorities did in Egypt, do anything to stem the spread of the disease. H1N1 has jumped to humans and is passing easily from person to person, so it's now a human flu that needs to be controlled in us, not the pigs.


3. Don't Hoard Antivirals
The H1N1 virus has so far proven vulnerable to the antiviral drugs Tamiflu and Relenza, which is good news. A cornerstone of the government's pandemic preparations was the stockpiling of 50 million doses of those drugs over the past few years, enough to ensure that doctors would be able to respond sufficiently to new outbreaks. But that capacity could be compromised if people begin stockpiling antivirals for their own use. Already there are reports of pharmacies running short of Tamiflu, and many hospitals in the U.S. have begun restricting the power to prescribe antivirals to just a few doctors. Also, the misuse or overuse of Tamiflu or Relenza by patients can promote resistance in the flu virus — effectively removing the only bullets from our gun.


4. Don't Leave Home If You Feel Sick
In the absence of a vaccine, the only defenses we have against the spread of H1N1 are simple ones. Cover your mouth when you sneeze or cough (with your arm, not your hands, to avoid spreading the virus through handshakes) and wash your hands frequently. Buy a pocket-sized bottle of hand sanitizer and use it — it's the easiest way to avoid getting sick.

But when it comes to slowing the overall spread of a pandemic flu, the best thing we can do is keep sick people away from everyone else. It's called "social distancing," and studies of the deadly 1918 Spanish flu showed that cities that instituted distancing measures quickly suffered lower death tolls than cities that did nothing or reacted slowly. So if you're feeling sick, don't go to work until you feel better — even though that may not be the most welcome advice for the nearly 50% of private-sector workers in the U.S. who don't get paid sick days.


5. Don`t Panic
TV anchors can't stop asking the question: "When is it time to start panicking?" How about never? Panic can only lead to stupid actions — on a personal and national level — that would likely make a pandemic worse.

As worrying as the epidemic has been, keep in mind that only one person so far has died of swine flu outside Mexico. Many scientists are beginning to think that even if we do have a full-fledged pandemic on our hands, it may likely be a mild one. A computer model by researchers at Northwestern University estimated that even if nothing were done to slow the spread of the disease from now on, by the end of May the U.S. would have only about 1,700 cases. The good news is that H1N1 is hitting North America at the tail end of its flu season. It's possible that the virus may peter out and re-appear next autumn, but that gives us months to prepare.

As WHO and CDC officials keep reiterating, influenza is an enigma, and H1N1 will keep evolving, keep changing — so we can't predict how the epidemic will progress. But one thing is certain: Panicking will only make the situation worse. "This is a cause for deep concern, but not panic," said President Barack Obama. In the midst of all this anxiety, that's the best advice there is.



:mtc:

#4 Bitoy

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 04:10 PM

I am aware that existing flu vaccines cannot prevent the swine flu from infecting us because it is a new strain. However, does it at least offer added resistance to the new virus?
I heard the Philippine Immigration Officers at airports where required to get the flu vaccine. Does it help?

#5 peterparker

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 07:26 PM

I am aware that existing flu vaccines cannot prevent the swine flu from infecting us because it is a new strain. However, does it at least offer added resistance to the new virus?
I heard the Philippine Immigration Officers at airports where required to get the flu vaccine. Does it help?



the new strain of H1N1 InfluenzaA virus has been found to be susceptible to Oseltamivir (Tamiflu) and Zanamivir (Relenza) which are available in the market bro, kaya it can be used for treatment and prevention of swine flu according to the CDC...



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#6 Bitoy

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 08:22 PM

the new strain of H1N1 InfluenzaA virus has been found to be susceptible to Oseltamivir (Tamiflu) and Zanamivir (Relenza) which are available in the market bro, kaya it can be used for treatment and prevention of swine flu according to the CDC...



:mtc:

Thanks bro. So is it advisable to get flu shots if Swine flu enters the Philippines?

#7 peterparker

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 08:42 PM

Thanks bro. So is it advisable to get flu shots if Swine flu enters the Philippines?



in the unfortunate event that Swine Flu enters the country, some of the the antiviral recommendations are...

Antiviral treatment should be considered for confirmed, probable or suspected cases of swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus infection. Treatment of hospitalized patients and patients at higher risk for influenza complications should be prioritized.


Antiviral Chemoprophylaxis:
For antiviral chemoprophylaxis of swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus infection, either oseltamivir or zanamivir are recommended. Duration of antiviral chemoprophylaxis post-exposure is 10 days after the last known exposure to an ill confirmed case of swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus infection. Post exposure prophylaxis should be considered for contact during the infectious period (e.g., one day before until 7 days after the case’s onset of illness). If the contact occurred more than 7 days earlier, then prophylaxis is not necessary. For pre-exposure protection, chemoprophylaxis should be given during the potential exposure period and continued for 10 days after the last known exposure to an ill confirmed case of swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus infection. Oseltamivir can also be used for chemoprophylaxis under the EUA.

Antiviral chemoprophylaxis with either oseltamivir or zanamivir is recommended for the following individuals:

1.Household close contacts who are at high-risk for complications of influenza (e.g., persons with certain chronic medical conditions, persons 65 or older, children younger than 5 years old, and pregnant women) of a confirmed or probable case.

2.Health care workers or public health workers who were not using appropriate personal protective equipment during close contact with an ill confirmed, probable, or suspect case of swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus infection during the case’s infectious period. See guidelines on personal protective equipment.

Antiviral chemoprophylaxis with either oseltamivir or zanamivir can be considered for the following:

1.Household close contacts who are at high-risk for complications of influenza (e.g., persons with certain chronic medical conditions, persons 65 years or older, children younger than 5 years old, and pregnant women) of a suspected case.

2.Children attending school or daycare who are at high-risk for complications of influenza (children with certain chronic medical conditions) and who had close contact (face-to-face) with a confirmed, probable, or suspected case.

3.Health care workers who are at high-risk for complications of influenza (e.g., persons with certain chronic medical conditions, persons 65 or older, and pregnant women) who are working in an area of the healthcare facility that contains patients with confirmed swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) cases, or who is caring for patients with any acute febrile respiratory illness.

4.Travelers to Mexico who are at high-risk for complications of influenza (e.g., persons with certain chronic medical conditions, persons 65 or older, children younger than 5 years old, and pregnant women). (Note: A travel warning is currently in effect indicating that nonessential travel to Mexico should be avoided.

5.First responders who are at high-risk for complications of influenza (e.g., persons with certain chronic medical conditions, persons 65 or older, children younger than 5 years old, and pregnant women) and who are working in areas with confirmed cases of swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus infection.




:mtc:

#8 mwah

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 09:09 PM

Thanks bro. So is it advisable to get flu shots if Swine flu enters the Philippines?


I personally recommend yearly flu shots to my patients and their families even without the H1N1/Swine flu outbreaks since influenza remains one of the top causes of morbidity in the country. In addition to this, flu and its complications cause about 30000 deaths yearly worldwide.

The cost of the vaccine is very minimal - roughly equivalent to 6 or 7 cups of your fave Starbucks coffee.

#9 GEORGESKIE

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Posted 04 May 2009 - 08:38 PM

tnx for the info.... it helps a lot in understanding this swine flu

#10 mhim101

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Posted 04 May 2009 - 09:17 PM

thanks po sa info's

#11 peterparker

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Posted 04 May 2009 - 09:34 PM

this just in...


WHO head indicates full flu pandemic to be declared


MADRID/GENEVA (Reuters) – The World Health Organization is likely to raise its flu alert to the top of its six-point scale and declare a pandemic, its director-general indicated in an interview published on Monday.

In remarks setting the scene for another alert increase, but without saying when, WHO chief Margaret Chan warned against over-confidence following a stabilization in the number of new cases of the H1N1 strain that has proved deadly in Mexico.

"Level 6 does not mean, in any way, that we are facing the end of the world. It is important to make this clear because (otherwise) when we announce level 6 it will cause an unnecessary panic," she told Spanish newspaper El Pais.

"Flu viruses are very unpredictable, very deceptive ... We should not be over-confident. One must not give H1N1 the opportunity to mix with other viruses. That is why we are on alert."

The WHO's pandemic phases reflect views about how a virus is spreading, and not how severe its effects are.

Last week the United Nations agency raised the alert level twice, from 3 to the current 5, in response to the sustained transmission of H1N1 in Mexico and the United States.

Before issuing a level 6 alert, the WHO would need to see the virus spreading within communities in Europe or Asia.

A declaration of a full pandemic would send a signal to governments worldwide to institute their pandemic response plans, which may include measures affecting hospitals, schools or public events.

Phase 6 would also trigger increased support for developing countries which lack the drugs, diagnostic tests, and medical staff to respond appropriately to the flu that the WHO has said could be especially dangerous for people with HIV/AIDS.

While the top-level alert would not have an automatic effect on the world's flu vaccine production, the WHO is expected to make an announcement alongside any such declaration to specify whether manufacturers should switch from making seasonal to pandemic flu vaccines.

In her remarks to El Pais, Chan said that weather patterns could play an important role in how the flu continues to spread. The southern hemisphere is about to enter winter, when seasonal flu cases normally spike, the infectious disease expert said.

"We have to be very careful. No one can predict what is going to happen when countries in the south have flu peaks and this new one arrives -- which it is going to do, without a doubt," she said.

On Sunday, a WHO spokesman said the relatively large number of infections in Spain of what has been commonly known as swine flu -- at 40, according to the WHO's count -- seemed to be mainly "imported" cases involving people returning from Mexico, the epicenter of the disease outbreak.

Chan echoed this and said that so far, there were not many flu patients in Europe that have not been to Mexico or had direct contact with those who had.

"It is true that the number is small, but because of that I would say that we have not seen the full situation or the whole picture of what is happening. The situation is evolving and the virus is changing," she said.

Chan, who fought SARS and bird flu in her previous job as Hong Kong's health director, said it was too early to predict what proportion of the population would catch the new flu strain after the European Union predicted 40 percent of the population would become infected.



:mtc:
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#12 cuatro_ojos

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Posted 04 May 2009 - 11:08 PM

How one can get the swine flu virus :P

Posted Image

Edited by cuatro_ojos, 04 May 2009 - 11:13 PM.


#13 stonecoldrock

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 11:58 AM

Any update on this?

#14 peterparker

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Posted 19 May 2009 - 04:59 PM

Any update on this?



Flu pandemic may be unfolding: WHO

GENEVA (Reuters) – Humanity may be witnessing an influenza pandemic unfold, the head of the World Health Organization said on Monday, as Japan reported a big jump in infections with the newly-discovered H1N1 virus.

Flu fears dominated the start of the WHO's annual congress in Geneva, where many of the 40 countries touched by the flu strain urged the United Nations agency to rethink its pandemic alert scale that is now at the second-highest notch.

WHO Director-General Margaret Chan said the outbreak that began in North America and has stretched to Europe, Asia and South America needed to be tackled with seriousness even though its symptoms appear to be largely mild.

"For the first time in humanity, we are seeing, or we may be seeing, pandemic influenza evolving in front of our eyes," Chan told the World Health Assembly meeting in Geneva, where rich and poor governments discussed their drug, vaccine and other needs.

"We are all under pressure to make urgent and far-reaching decisions in an atmosphere of considerable scientific uncertainty," Chan told the annual congress, which was shortened in length to allow health ministers to go home earlier and resume their monitoring for flu infections.

Several topics including food safety and viral hepatitis were dropped from the agenda while drug-resistant tuberculosis was initially slated to be postponed and then re-added at the last moment with support from China and others.

According to the WHO's latest tally, 74 people have died from H1N1 infection. Most of the other nearly 9,000 patients have suffered mild effects like fever and diarrhea from the bug that is a genetic mix of swine, bird and human viruses.

But its rapid spread between people and across countries has caused the WHO to raise the alert and declare a pandemic is "imminent," a designation that reflects views on the way the new virus is spreading and not the seriousness of its effects.

Mexico, Britain, China, Egypt, Switzerland and the United Arab Emirates were among those who called at the opening-day session for the WHO to rethink its criteria for declaring a pandemic, which under current rules would occur when the virus is spreading in a sustained way in two regions of the world.

British Health Secretary Alan Johnson said the "mechanistic process" now in place seems to give the wrong public impression about the seriousness of the flu, which can be treated without drugs in most cases.

Chan, who also fought bird flu and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in her tenure as Hong Kong health director, said she would consider the request that came just as the number of infections in Japan, Britain and Spain approached critical mass.

The WHO said its laboratories have confirmed 125 cases in Japan, 103 in Spain and 101 in Britain.

OUTBREAK NOT OVER

Officials from its North American stronghold said the virus was still spreading, albeit in a seemingly less virulent form.

Richard Besser, head of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, told a high-level session that the H1N1 strain has reached nearly all 50 U.S. states and was likely to circulate worldwide.

"While we are not seeing the seriousness of illness that was initially reported in Mexico, the outbreak is not over," he said. Mexico's Health Minister Jose Angel Cordova said there was a slow but steady fall in the number of cases in his country.

If H1N1 flu does reach all corners of the world, the WHO's Chan said there would be certain communities at particular risk -- including people living in slums and shantytowns, pregnant women, and patients with HIV/AIDS and other health problems.

Poor countries are seeking international assistance to get drugs, diagnostic tests and medical personnel needed to combat an outbreak which has so far not been identified in Africa or in the world's most impoverished areas.

Developing nations are also negotiating fair access to antiviral drugs like Tamiflu and to any vaccines developed to fight the H1N1 strain.

Officials will also seek an agreement on how samples of the virus should be handled and shared with pharmaceutical companies working to develop vaccines to fight the strain.

The WHO's Chan is due to hold meetings on Tuesday with U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and top executives from several pharmaceutical companies, which are waiting for a signal about whether to start making H1N1 jabs or to include the strain in the seasonal flu vaccine mix.




:mtc:

#15 bcsiy

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Posted 19 May 2009 - 05:10 PM

Is it true that we have cases of H1N1 virus here in the Philippines? Please confirm. Thanks!

#16 peterparker

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Posted 19 May 2009 - 05:38 PM

Is it true that we have cases of H1N1 virus here in the Philippines? Please confirm. Thanks!


the latest reports from the WHO state that no confirmed H1N1 cases have been reported in our country...

the DOH also says that we still don`t have any confirmed cases...

among our neighboring countries, Japan, Thailand, Malaysia and Hongkong all have confirmed cases of the H1N1 virus kaya there is a real risk na puwedeng umabot yung virus sa bansa natin...





:mtc:

Edited by peterparker, 19 May 2009 - 05:39 PM.


#17 bcsiy

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Posted 19 May 2009 - 06:37 PM

the latest reports from the WHO state that no confirmed H1N1 cases have been reported in our country...

the DOH also says that we still don`t have any confirmed cases...

among our neighboring countries, Japan, Thailand, Malaysia and Hongkong all have confirmed cases of the H1N1 virus kaya there is a real risk na puwedeng umabot yung virus sa bansa natin...





:mtc:


Thanks sir! I really hope the virus doesn't reach the Philippines...scary!

#18 mwah

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 11:18 PM

The country just had its first case of AH1N1.

#19 mackyboy

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 11:55 PM

DoH confirms first A(H1N1) case in RP

Edited by mackyboy, 21 May 2009 - 11:56 PM.


#20 Bitoy

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Posted 22 May 2009 - 12:08 AM

May info na ba kung saan yung 1st case of A(H1N1)?




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