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#1 lonely62699

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Posted 26 July 2010 - 07:28 AM

sino may alam tungkol sa religion na to? ang alam ko lang is karma and reincarnation... inputs naman...

#2 ndn

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Posted 26 July 2010 - 10:07 AM

Sa totoo lamg bro hindi ako naniniwala sa religion na ito. Ang pinaniniwalaan ko lang dito is yung concept ng KARMA. Although hindi nako nakapagsisimba at hindi kita sa actions ko,still CHRISTIAN pa din ako.

#3 TheSmilingBandit

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Posted 26 July 2010 - 11:05 AM

Sa totoo lamg bro hindi ako naniniwala sa religion na ito. Ang pinaniniwalaan ko lang dito is yung concept ng KARMA. Although hindi nako nakapagsisimba at hindi kita sa actions ko,still CHRISTIAN pa din ako.

A true Christian wouldn't believe in the concept of karma as that goes against the whole heaven/hell/purgatory setting.

#4 swynd

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Posted 26 July 2010 - 11:53 AM

I think the "karma" that people generally believe in is the "do good things and good things happen to you, do bad things and bad things happen to you" kind of karma... which is not what Buddhism actually teaches...

@lonely62699: Wikipedia lang po. Hehe.

#5 TheSmilingBandit

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Posted 26 July 2010 - 12:29 PM

I think the "karma" that people generally believe in is the "do good things and good things happen to you, do bad things and bad things happen to you" kind of karma... which is not what Buddhism actually teaches...

@lonely62699: Wikipedia lang po. Hehe.

What else is karma but that explanation?

#6 swynd

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Posted 26 July 2010 - 12:53 PM

What else is karma but that explanation?


Ah, sorry, I forgot to add there... Karma applies on a per life basis. Meaning, karma we accumulate now affects us in the next life. This is what you referred to as contradictory to Christian belief. The usual "Karma" people generally believe affects people within the same life. Yeah, it's the "My Name is Earl" karma. That's what I was driving at.

Edited by swynd, 26 July 2010 - 12:53 PM.


#7 ndn

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Posted 26 July 2010 - 01:03 PM

A true Christian wouldn't believe in the concept of karma as that goes against the whole heaven/hell/purgatory setting.


What i meant is the concept of Karma is somewhat same with "You will reap what you sow",which is in the Bible. :lol:

Edited by ndn, 26 July 2010 - 01:05 PM.


#8 cocoy0

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Posted 26 July 2010 - 09:38 PM

May Mahayana, may Hinayana na katumbas ng sects ng ibang religion. Offshoot ang Buddhism ng HInduism in a similar way na ang Christianity ay nanggaling sa Judaism. Kaya pagdating sa doctrine, may mga pagkakahawig. Isa rito ang divine nature ng tao. Ang tao ay parte ng diyos na si Brahma (also called the Creator, at ang holy animal niya ay ang baka). Actually, lahat ng nabubuhay sa mundo ay parte ng diyos. At dito papasok ang sinasabi nating karma. Kung ang tao ay mamatay, pwede nga na mabuhay ito uli sa katawan ng isa pang may buhay, hayop man o tao pa rin (transmigration of souls). Pwede rin na ang isang hayop na kapag mamatay ay mabuhay uli sa katawan ng tao. Ang sistemang ito ay naaayon sa kung paano nabuhay ang isang nilalang. Mayroon silang itinuturo na hierarchy kung saan ang pinakamataas ay nirvana. Ang ibig sabihin ng nirvana sa Hinduismo ay ang pakikipag-isa ng isang nilalang sa Brahma.

Isa pang bagay that they share is the concept of dharma. It has a loose term among Jainism, Buddhism, Sikhism and Hinduism (dharmic traditions)but it basically means what a being must do to be correct. Thus it will help one to move closer to attaining nirvana.

Ang buddhism naman, in general, tried to do away with the multitude of gods and demigods sa Hinduism. For them there is only a concept of divine, and a being's quest to move closer to it.

May tinutukoy sa ibang sekta ng Buddhism (I forgot which) na mga Bodhisattva. Ito iyung mga being na instead of reaching nirvana, mas pinili nila na tumulong sa ibang tao. Mas accurate ang definition na iyan instead of the usual connotation, Buddhist saint.

#9 lonely62699

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Posted 16 August 2010 - 07:41 AM

ung mga after life and next life sa buddhism din d ba?

ung mga after life and next life sa buddhism din d ba?

#10 tlpnds

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Posted 23 August 2010 - 02:48 PM

Meron akong nabasang magandang book tungkol sa Buddhism. Simple lang ang title--Buddhism Explained, parang ganun. It was written by a Buddhist na academician din, may PhD or something. The book covered a bit about the history of Buddhism, and of course it starts with Gautama Buddha meditating under the tree by the river. And then, the narrative follows the gradual and incremental spread of Buddhism from one place to another.

The writer did not qualify "Buddhism" as strictly a "religion". I can see the point. Buddhism in some respects can be called a "philosophy" of living. Sa doktrina kasi ng Buddhism, wala namang "morality" to begin with. All your actions are not judged as being "right" or "wrong". There are just "actions" and "consequences". Some actions bring consequences that bring persons closer to the ideal state of nirvana. Some actions make it harder for you or for others to do so because of their consequences.

At its most basic level, as how I understood it, Buddhism's first "duty" ( if you can call it that ) is to make everyone understand the "Four Noble Truths", kasama na yung "Life Is Suffering", etc.

When a person properly comprehends the Four Truths, it will be easier for that person to choose his or her actions. You can either act in accordance with the Four Noble Truths, or you can act as if those truths were not important. The disadvantage of living a life that does not take into account the Four Noble Truths is that you will essentially live an unhappy life. For example, if you knew that "Life Is Suffering", and yet you act everyday as if it was not true, then hindi ka din sasaya and you will suffer even more. It can be funny to think about, but in Buddhism, the concept it sacred. Buddhism says that you cannot escape suffering, but there is a proper way of negotiating the suffering so that it will not matter anymore.

After the death of Gautama Buddha, the "philosophy" ( or religion, if you would like to think of it that way ) was popularized by many of his students, all of whom presumably had already reached "Buddha-hood". Many of those "Buddha's" developed their own interpretations of the Gautama's teachings. This was in ancient times pa, remember, and so the different interpretations became "sub-philosophies". It's the same way as how Catholicism has different interpretations as seen in different Religious Orders, e.g., Dominicans, Franciscans, Opus Dei, etc.

These branches of Buddhism eventually evolved their own pathways. The Buddhists in Tibet began practicing Tibetan Buddhism, which includes the teachings that there are actually "gods". Indian Buddhists migrated to China and converted many mainland Chinese, including an emperor. The Buddhist branch in China became known as "Ch'an". This same "Ch'an", if the scholarly records are accurate, reached across the sea from China and reached the shores of Imperial Japan. "Ch'an" then became "Zen" in Japan. Zen is one of the most popular strands of Buddhism today. But Indian interpretations of Buddhism continue to draw followers, and thus we see "Mahayanas", "Hare Krishna", et cetera.

Personally, I am more of a Zen fan. Just a fan, not a full-fledged practitioner. The discipline of Zen, I hear, can be demanding. What I like about this interpretation is how it insists that rigorous self-examination must be performed in the context of "is"-ness. But like other posters might already have said, Buddhism is not apprehended simply by words. It is important for the seeker to go out and experience firsthand the wonder and chaos of the world.
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#11 cocoy0

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Posted 23 August 2010 - 10:52 PM

@lonely62699: I think so. Pero less exotic kaysa sa Hindu. Sa ibang sect nila, ang pagiging monk ay determined at hindi pinipili. Kumbaga, a person is reincarnated into a monk, hindi human. :)

@tlpnds: The thing with Zen is, is not philosophy, but the development of insight. Kaya gumagamit sila ng mga riddles at paradoxes para pakawalan ang isip sa reason. Mas mahalaga sa kanila ang insight o ang sudden flash of understanding.

Parang meditation in which one concentrates on a thought, pero ang goal is to clear the mind. Tapos sa Zen, insight.

Edited by cocoy0, 23 August 2010 - 10:57 PM.


#12 knoll1234

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Posted 02 September 2010 - 02:10 AM

my best friend, not really religious, but a malaysian scholar now working for intel, told me this when I asked him about his religious beliefs. He said," buddhism is a way of life, not a religion". I got puzzled by his answer. but still one of the best friend I have. A practising buddhist.

#13 cocoy0

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Posted 11 September 2010 - 01:39 AM

@knoll: Perhaps the way your friend interprets it, religion is always organized religion, with rituals and prescribed prayers and doctrine. Buddhism is closely tied with philosophy. Often in popular culture, Buddhist philosophy is identified as Oriental or Asian philosophy (walang alam talaga, e sa laki ng Asia hindi lang Buddhism ang meron dito).

#14 moldie[bard]

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Posted 26 September 2010 - 10:43 PM

Just BE GOOD!


The Buddha's advice is to :


Do Good, Avoid Evil, and Purify the Mind.


In practical everyday terms, this means the practice of Dana, Sila and Bhavana.



What is Dana?

This simply means 'giving', charity or helping others. This can be practiced in many different ways. You can do so through speech by using kind and encouraging words with others. Even giving something as simple as a smile can help another if it cheers them up and brightens their day.

You can always lend a hand to anyone who needs help. You can volunteer your efforts or your resources to the less fortunate. You can also share the Buddha's Teachings to anyone who is interested in them. It is the greatest gift of all.

However, try to do all this without regret, discrimination or ulterior motives. Practice Dana with kindness, compassion and empathy.



What is Sila?

This means 'Morality' and the Buddha advised us to observe the Five Precepts in the cultivation of Sila :

1. Abstain from killing any living beings.
2. Abstain from taking what is not given.
3. Abstain from sexual misconduct.
4. Abstain from lying and false speech.
5. Abstain from the abusive consumption of intoxicants and drugs.

These Precepts are not commandments, but are rules that Buddhists take upon themselves to observe. They are observed not because of fear of punishment but because we realize that such actions harm others as well as ourselves.

For example, as we ourselves do not wish to be killed or harmed, we realize that all other beings also do not wish to be killed or harmed. Likewise as we do not wish to be victims of theft, adultery, lies and slander, we ourselves should avoid doing such acts to others.

The Buddha also strongly advocated avoiding intoxicants and drugs. This is because once you have come under the influence of alcohol or illicit drugs, you are capable of committing any acts that you would not have done otherwise.

Should you break the Precepts, the Buddhist way is to be fully aware that you have done so, try your best to make amends, and then resolve to try harder from then on.

Morality is the foundation which everything else rests upon. It thus might be a good idea to memorize the Five Precepts so that you can be mindful of them at all times.

One of our free distribution items is a colourful and attractive bookmark with the Five Precepts, which you can keep with you always as a gentle reminder.

And once the observing of the Five Precepts becomes an instinctive part of your behaviour, developing its positive aspects will come easily and naturally :

1. The practice of Harmlessness and Compassion.
2. The practice of Kindness and Generosity.
3. The practice of Faithfulness and Responsibility.
4. The practice of Truthfulness and Pleasant Speech.
5. The practice of Self-control and Mindfulness.



What is Bhavana?

Bhavana means the practice of 'Mind Cultivation' or simply meditation. Meditation can be said to purify the mind by making it easier to develop Generosity and Compassion, and then to finally acquire Wisdom.

Buddhist meditation is usually classified into two types - Vipassana or Insight meditation, and Samatha or Concentration meditation. There are many forms of Samatha meditation, and Metta or Loving-Kindness meditation is one of its more widely practiced forms. All these types of meditation have their benefits.

However, it is usually recognized that it is through the practice of Vipassana or Insight meditation that we can come to fully know ourselves. And that through this we will be able to better realize and understand the Buddha's Teachings and to see things as they truly are.

Meditation can be said to be the highest form of Buddhist practice as the Buddha himself attained Enlightenment through meditation.

You do not need long meditation sessions to begin with. Even a short 10 to 20 minute session every day or every other day will do wonders. This is a good place to start learning Buddhist Meditation.




Do we need to worship the Buddha, go to temples regularly, or make offerings or sacrifices?

Buddhists do not worship the Buddha. We consider Him as our Teacher and we thus respect Him as such. Buddhists bowing to a statue of the Buddha is simply our way of showing respect. This is akin to saluting a country's flag, or standing up while a national anthem is being played.

There is also no strict need to visit temples regularly. Many Buddhists however, do so to meet with fellow Buddhists or learn more about the Teachings. There is also no requirement at all to make offerings, and Buddhists certainly do not make any sacrifices whatsoever!

The Buddha said that the best way to respect Him is to practice what he had taught. This means a mindful and consistent practice, as opposed to visiting a temple once a week, and reverting to bad habits the rest of the time.

What is the significance of the Buddhist offerings?

Traditionally, joss or incense sticks, candles, and flowers are three of the common offerings. Informed Buddhists will know that these items are not really 'offerings', but are actually just symbolic reminders.

For example. joss sticks or incense remind us of the 'fragrance' of the Buddha's Teachings which pervade the world. Candles represent His Teachings which light our way in darkness. And flowers remind us that our lives are impermanent, like the flowers we 'offer'.

Flowers when in bloom are beautiful and sweet smelling, but will fade and whither after only a few days. Similarly, all of us will eventually grow old and die. Therefore, the flowers remind us that we should use as much of our time as possible to do good for others, and to practice the Buddha's Teachings.

So what basically is kamma?

Kamma literally means 'intentional action', and this refers to the Buddhist belief in the Principle of Cause and Effect. We believe that every intentional act will give rise to a corresponding result, in either the present life or in a future one.

The results of kamma should thus not be seen as rewards or punishments for acts done, but simply the results or outcome of any such intentional acts. Positive actions will eventually result in positive consequences, and negative actions will eventually result in negative consequences.

Using an ordinary common-sense example of Cause and Effect, take a person who smokes, drinks and eats excessively without doing any regular exercise. As a result of his actions, this person will have a high likelihood of having a stroke or heart disease and ultimately go through much suffering. On the other hand, a person who watches his diet and takes good care of his body will usually be able to have a healthy life, even in old age.

Therefore, a person who has done much good and thus accumulated much positive kamma will likely enjoy a happy life and gravitate towards a Human, or even a Heavenly realm of existence in the next rebirth. Conversely, someone who has done many bad deeds and accumulated much negative kamma may have a life plagued with difficulties, and then also be reborn in a Lower realm of existence.

Kamma can also be viewed as seeds. You have the choice of the seeds you wish to grow. Therefore sow as many good seeds as you possibly can!

More on kamma and rebirth in our More Questions page.




The importance of Kamma :

Kamma is the only possession we really own,
and which we take with us from life to life.

Every intentional act of body,
speech and mind is like a seed planted;
that will grow when conditions are right.
Thus as you sow, you shall reap.



What if we have already done many bad things? Can we ask the Buddha to forgive us?

The Buddha is considered our Teacher and not someone that we pray to for forgiveness. Buddhists do not believe in any external agencies that we must ask forgiveness from, or worship for salvation.

If Buddhists were to ask for forgiveness, it would be to the person that we wronged, and not to a third party or external agency. If it were not possible to be forgiven by the person we wronged or to make amends, then we should let the matter go, learn from it and forgive ourselves, of course provided that we are sincere about it.

The Buddha teaches us that we are each responsible for our own actions, and that we are each capable of shaping our own destinies. We should thus consider carefully before doing anything wrong, and instead try to do right at all times.

If you are unsure whether an action is right or wrong, you can apply this simple rule of thumb as taught by the Buddha : if the action harms either yourself or another, or both; then avoid doing that action. If not, then go right on ahead!

Abraham Lincoln :
"When I do good, I feel good.
When I do bad, I feel bad.
That's my religion."
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#15 the_greenhorny

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Posted 09 October 2010 - 06:49 PM

Do not believe in anything simply because you have heard it. Do not believe in anything simply because it is spoken and rumored by many. Do not believe in anything simply because it is found written in your religious books. Do not believe in anything merely on the authority of your teachers and elders. Do not believe in traditions because they have been handed down for many generations. But after observation and analysis, when you find that anything agrees with reason and is conducive to the good and benefit of one and all, then accept it and live up to it.
- Buddha

#16 monazario

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Posted 09 November 2010 - 09:20 AM

entirely different with taoism?

#17 cocoy0

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Posted 30 January 2011 - 03:19 PM

@monazario: Yes, it is. Taoism as it was defined in history is a different thing.

#18 Shizuka

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 07:25 PM

Once in a while I attend a meditation session in Brahma Kumaris. They promote it as spirituality and not as a religion though I find that most of the precepts they present to us are rooted in Buddhism. I like it and so far its teachings hasn't clashed with the religion I was initiated to when I was born, Catholicism. I just choose what philosophies and ideas I want to adopt.

#19 KillTheDEVIL

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 03:09 PM

I admire the Buddhists for their being peace-loving

#20 KillTheDEVIL

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 03:13 PM

A true Christian wouldn't believe in the concept of karma as that goes against the whole heaven/hell/purgatory setting.


That's right. Karma leads to the idea of reincarnation which is not part of the official
Christian teaching. For Christians, we only live once then we will be judged at an appropriate time either to go to hell or to go to heaven depending on whether or not we are pleasing to God based on how much we have shown love to others when we were still on earth




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