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The Big "c"


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#1 bonjing

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Posted 20 July 2005 - 10:57 AM

Good Day to all....

Just wanted your take on this subject. Your fears, questions, opinions, and whatever... If you would like support, I hope this thread can handle it too...

I'll start the ball rolling.

I lost my wife of 16 years to Breast Cancer. We battled it for almost 3.5 years, but in the end, we lost. It was a long, painful, uphill battle. It drained us financially, emotionally, physically. Nearing the end my wife thanked me for the support. Told her not to thank me, as I would have done it even without her asking for it.

But life has to go on. Not advisable to just sit in a corner and sulk or be despondent about Life.

Life is to short not to enjoy it....

#2 Google

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Posted 20 July 2005 - 11:28 AM

hmmm. bad to hear that bro.

anyway, my take on this is that, i really like Rio Diaz' stand on this. she knows that she's losing, but her optimistic stance as well as her faith, ang ganda ng kinalabasan. i just pity her children...

#3 bonjing

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Posted 22 July 2005 - 08:30 AM

That is the stand of most cancer patients that i've met, and believingme, dami na nakilala ko. and I was quite shocked to find that cancer affects all age groups. There's this guy, mga 22 or 24 yata, who's the top athlete at their school, but now stricken. madalas namin nakakasabay, when my wife goes in for chemo. But he's not resigned to his fate. Malakas ang fighting spirit. We all pray for him. Sabi nya he intends to get back to playing basketball at his school again. some of the depressed ones get inspiration from him, ngayon

kaya for them cancer is just that. a word.

#4 Lipstick

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Posted 31 July 2005 - 10:32 PM

I lost my husband to the big C close to 9 months ago (wow has it just been that short and that long?). He had cancer of the liver but it was some lung complication that caused his death I think. He didn't have the benefit of chemo nor did the doctors offer any hope as the only treatment that could be given was palliative care since his cancer was in its very advanced stages already. The thing with Liver Cancer is that symptoms such as abdominal ascites, abdominal pain, etc., never come out until the very late stages and at this stage patients are given only 2-3months to live.

The very sad thing about my experience is that when these symptoms came out I rushed him to St. Luke's (at this point we didn't know he had cancer) and after 5days in the hospital the only thing his Doctors came up with was that he had cirrhosis and was anemic. He wasn't even given anything for the pain which he was in 24hours a day. I discovered that at this stage C patients are already given sedatives to relieve them. How could the doctor's at St. Luke's not even suspect he had liver cancer at all????

2 weeks after his hospitalization in Manila, my husband had to head back to Sydney (he resided there and we had just gotten married in Manila). He saw his specialists and they told him that he would be lucky to live past Christmas. His doctors told him that Chemo was not an option and luckily my husband understood this to mean that his body was just weak at the moment and soon as he was stronger he could have the treatment. That kept him living and hoping. For the next 18days the potency of his painkillers increased every 3 days or so which alarmed me. I saw the deterioration happen rapidly with each day that passed. Finally on a Monday, he had to see a palliative doctor and it was this bitch of a doctor who spelled it out to him that his condition was beyond chemo or any treatment to make him any better. He just lost his spirit that day and just stopped fighting. The next evening he was rushed to the hospital because of a very high fever caused by pneumonia and he passed away 2am Wednesday morning.

I wasn't there beside him all this time, through all his pain when he needed me most. I was in Manila tying loose ends at work, at home and fixing some petty details required by my visa. I didn't even get to say goodbye. I arrived in Sydney 2days after to bury my husband.

I don't know if cancer or death is best served swiftly or slowly. If I were given a choice I wouldn't know what to choose. I just keep consoling myself with the fact that the universe showed my husband mercy in the form of the briskness. But anyone who knows the pain of losing a lifepartner will also know that no thought can ever console the loss you feel while you are still hurting.

A month ago I lost a very dear friend to cancer too. He had lung cancer and was battling it for the last 2-3years. Chemo would work every 6months and then the cancer would just creep back into his system. This year it metastasized and spread to his liver. It was like re-living the ordeal I went through last year all over again. And the wound I carried inside me that seemed to be slowly healing just opened raw again.

My husband was an obstinate man who refused to have his regular medical check-ups. It only took a year and a half for his cancer to be born and allowed to breed aggressively in his body. If any of you are this obstinate about your medical check ups (or if you know of anyone), I am urging you to please please snap out of the phobia and have your check-ups regularly. Those that die have it lucky because they go to a beautiful place, it is those they leave behind that never quite recover.

They say that hell is your life gone wrong. Hell is where I resided for many months after my husband passed away. Today, I don't live there anymore but there are days when I find myself back in hell momentarily.

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Posted 01 August 2005 - 12:14 PM

I've been thinking of opening a thread on the big C. Just now, nakita ko to. I can't breathe. :(

Last week, i had a scare. Very few people understood the fear i had. For some bizarre reason, my own family could not comprehend why i was terrified. Why i was crying my head off for days.

There's cancer in the family, at least on my dad's side of the family. His eldest sister had her boobs removed, the 5th sister died of colon cancer and the 8th sister was spared from cancer, but had a hysterectomy. My fear has basis.

My fear is over FOR NOW. I don't know what will happen tomorrow, in the next 6 months, 1 year... i don't hold the future in my hands. Somehow i am just glad that i found out na, and that i had the chance to be checked for the symptoms. I just hope and pray everyday that i would not wake up one day and be told that the treatment didn't work the way it should. I pray that the remedy and preventive medication works in my favor now.

I am not afraid of death itself, it's the process, the painful way of passing, and the pain it is bound to bring the people i love, that's what i fear.

ay potah, di ako makahinga. bye.

Edited by the_eight_of_orbs, 01 August 2005 - 12:25 PM.


#6 bonjing

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Posted 01 August 2005 - 03:07 PM

Would like to share this with you and hopefully you could share it to others too....

THE TEN COMMANDMENTS OF CANCER

1. Thou shalt regard the word, "Cancer", as exactly that: a word. Nothing more, nothing less. For its original meaning has changed mightily over the years, as have such words as Smallpox, TB, and Polio, all once dreaded ailments, now non-existent as maladies. And thus, too, shall go thy Cancer. The answer shall come to those who shall be present to hear it. Be present to hear it when it comes.

2. Thou shalt love thy chemotherapy, thy radiation, and thy other treatments even as thyself, for they are thy friends and champions. Although they may exact a toll for their endeavors, they are oft most generous in the favors they bestow.

3. Thou shalt participate fully in thy recovery. Thou shalt learn all the details of thy ailment, its diagnosis, its prognosis, its treatments, conventional and alternative. Thou shalt discuss them openly and candidly with thy oncologist and shalt question all thou do not comprehend. Then, thou shalt cooperate intelligently, and knowledgeably with thy doctor.

4. Thou shalt regard thy ailment as a temporary detour in thy life and shalt plan thy future as though this detour had not occurred. Thou shalt never, at no time, no how, regard thy temporary ailment as permanent. Thou shalt set long-term goals for thyself. For thou will verily recover and your believing so will contribute mightily to thy recovery.

5. Thou shalt express thy feelings candidly and openly to thy loved ones for they, too, are stricken. Thou shalt comfort and reassure them for they, too, needest comforting and reassurance, even as thou doest.

6. Thou shalt be a comfort to thy fellow-cancerites, providing knowledge, encouragement, understanding and love. You shalt give them hope where there may be none, for only in hope lies their salvation. And by doing so, thou providest comfort for thyself, as well.

7. Thou shalt never relinquish hope, no matter how thou may feelest at that moment, for thou knowest, in the deep recesses of thy heart, that thy discouragement is but fleeting and that a better day awaits thee, perhaps tomorrow, perhaps the day after tomorrow - but certainly it shall come.

8. Thou shalt not regard thy ailment as the sum total of thy life but as merely a part of it. Fill your life with other diversions, be they mundane, daring, altruistic, or merely amusing. To fill your life with your ailment is to surrender to it.

9. Thou shalt maintain, at all times and in all circumstances, thy sense of humor, for laughter lightens thy heart and hastens thy recovery. This is not an easy task, sometimes seemingly impossible, but it is a goal well worth the endeavor.

10. Thou shalt have enduring and unassailable faith, whether thy faith be in a Supreme Being, in Medical Science, in Thy Future, in Thyself, or in Whatever. Steadfastly sustain thy faith for it shall sustain thee.

- Paul H. Klein © September 1993

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Posted 01 August 2005 - 04:09 PM

my brother sent me this also the other day. :)
:*

10. Thou shalt have enduring and unassailable faith, whether thy faith be in a Supreme Being, in Medical Science, in Thy Future, in Thyself, or in Whatever.  Steadfastly sustain thy faith for it shall sustain thee.           

- Paul H. Klein      September 1993

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#8 bonjing

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Posted 02 August 2005 - 02:31 PM

May i be so bold as to venture into saying, I emphatize and understand the feelings you're going thru. But, be strong and live life to the fullest. Carpe Diem.

#9 voyeurguy

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Posted 08 August 2005 - 06:33 PM

May i be so bold as to venture into saying, I emphatize and understand the feelings you're going thru.  But, be strong and live life to the fullest. Carpe Diem.

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Yup Im sure Lance Armstrong will tell everyone to "Live Strong"! The guy several years ago had testicular cancer that spread to his lungs and brain. He was in the middle of a thriving cycling career when it hit him. Underwent painful chemo as well as brain surgery. Several years after, he still managed to race and win the Tour de France, the most gruelling cycling race, an unprecedented 7 times. If he can do it, Im sure others can as well.

#10 voyeurguy

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Posted 08 August 2005 - 07:02 PM

Yup Im sure Lance Armstrong will tell everyone to "Live Strong"!  The guy several years ago had testicular cancer that spread to his lungs and brain. He was in the middle of a thriving cycling career when it hit him. Underwent painful chemo as well as brain surgery. Several years after, he still managed to race and win the Tour de France, the most gruelling cycling race, an unprecedented 7 times. If he can do it, Im sure others can as well.

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I missed this out. Early detection is key to surviving the BIg C. So better get a yearly executive check up just to make sure there are no surprises later on.

#11 voyeurguy

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Posted 08 August 2005 - 07:06 PM

I missed this out. Early detection is key to surviving the BIg C. So better get a yearly executive check up just to make sure there are no surprises later on.

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Also, once you hit 40, better get a procto as well to check for prostate or colon problems. A bit uncomfortable and humiliating but at least your sure.

#12 grovel

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Posted 29 August 2005 - 08:02 AM

This disease took my mom's life about a year and a half ago. Its hard being an MD at these time, coz when your doctor friends tell you, and you yourself know that there's nothing left to do, you feel hopeless, thinking what the heck have you been studying all this time!!!

Anyway, since then, i've been employed in a sort of alternative medical clinic which entailed not just the use of herbs, but also nutrition as a form of treatment for cancer. Sometimes it works on its own, however, i would advise combining it with conventional therapy. if anyone would like some info on cancer prevention tips and advise, just pm me would gladly help. Maybe if i could help others, i could at least diminish the helplessness i felt when my mom was sick.

#13 moymoy

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Posted 16 September 2005 - 02:01 PM

:( to avoid to have a big C , take care or yourselves have a healthy living avoid vices like drinking & most especially smoking. Its alarming that more more young people are engaged in smoking. I dont wonder why many people today have the big C. Its there own choice so better face the consequences :(

#14 Archviscount

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Posted 20 September 2005 - 06:35 PM

im sorry if it sounds like i am just messing around but i like to ask one thing.. whats the big C

#15 Lipstick

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Posted 20 September 2005 - 10:14 PM

im sorry if it sounds like i am just messing around but i like to ask one thing.. whats the big C

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Cancer is often referred to as the Big C.

#16 northampton

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Posted 27 September 2005 - 03:04 PM

ANTI CANCER VEGETABLES AND FRUITS

BROCCOLI

How it combats cancer: Research has revealed that a chemical component called indole-3-carbinol can combat breast cancer by converting a cancer-promoting estrogen into a more protective variety. The phytochemical sulforaphane raises the levels of certain cancer-fighting enzymes that defend the body from cigarette smoke, fumes, pesticides & other known carcinogens.

Diet tips: Broccoli leaves actually contain more beta-carotene (i.e. pre-Vitamin A) than the florets - use leaves in purees, soups, and stir-fries. To preserve broccoli’s valuable nutrients, steam or microwave, being careful not to overcook. Avoid garnishing broccoli with fatty cheeses and creams instead, squeeze on some lemon juice or sprinkle with toasted breadcrumbs.

PAPAYA

How it combats cancer: Its plentiful store of vitamin C works as an antioxidant and may also reduce absorption of cancer-causing nitro amines from the soil or processed foods. Papaya contains folacin (also known as folic acid), which has been shown to minimize cervical dysplasia and certain cancers.

Diet tips: Choose papayas that are at least half yellow in the store. Fully green ones were probably picked too soon and won’t ripen properly. You can serve papaya in fruit salad, add it to a garlic-and-spinach pasta mixture, or just eat it on its own, letting the juice dribble down your arm.

GARLIC

How it combats cancer: Garlic’s immune-enhancing allium compounds block carcinogens from entering cells and slow tumor development. Diallyl sulfide, a component of garlic oil, has also shown to render carcinogens in the liver inactive. Studies have linked garlic - as well as onions, leeks, and chives - lower risk of stomach and colon cancer.

Diet tips: Add raw garlic to salads; use it fresh in marinades and sauces;
rub freshly cut garlic around the insides of salad bowls and over chicken
and fish fillets. Avoid dried or powdered garlic, which is less
concentrated - and less effective

KALE

How it combats cancer: Research has shown that indoles, nitrogen compounds found in kale and other leafy greens, may help stop the conversion of certain lesions to cancerous cells in estrogen-sensitive tissues. In addition, isothiocyanates, phytochemicals found in kale, are thought to suppress tumor growth and block cancer-causing substances from reaching their targets.

Diet tips: A cruciferous vegetable, kale requires quick cooking - blanching or steaming - to preserve its nutrients. When you’re done, save the nutrient-rich cooking liquid for soups or sauces. You can also use whole large leaves to wrap fillings or to layer in lasagna.

SWEET POTATO

How it combats cancer: This nutrient-dense food contains many anticancer properties. It’s loaded with beta-carotene, which may protect DNA in the cell nucleus from cancer-causing chemicals outside the nuclear membrane.

Diet tips: Go for freshness when picking potatoes - canned varieties contain less beta-carotene and vitamins C and B. Naturally sweet and creamy, mashed sweet potatoes can be enhanced with a little apple juice. Or whip the cooked tubers with orange zest or orange juice and season with cinnamon, nutmeg, and ginger.

GRAPEFRUIT

How it combats cancer: Grapefruits, like oranges and other citrus fruits, contain monoterpenes, believed to help prevent cancer by sweeping carcinogens out of the body. Some studies show that grapefruit can inhibit the proliferation of breast-cancer cells in vitro. It also contains vitamin C, beta-carotene, and folic acid.

Diet tips: Grapefruit can be sweetened with brown sugar or a drizzle of maple syrup or honey; vanilla extract, fresh mint, and almonds also accent the fruit’s flavor. Grapefruit juice will give you the antioxidants and phytochemicals that fight cancer, but it’s missing the fiber that fresh, whole grapefruit offers.

AVOCADO

How it combats cancer: Avocados are rich in glutathione, a powerful antioxidant that attacks free radicals in the body by blocking intestinal absorption of certain fats. Ounce for ounce, avocados also supply 60 percent more potassium than bananas and are a strong source of beta-carotene.

Diet tips: Store avocados at room temperature until they soften. If you don’t eat the fruit immediately after cutting, sprinkle on some lemon or limejuice to keep it from darkening. Add chunks or slices to salads and sandwiches or spread mashed avocado on bread.

SEAWEED

How they combat cancer: Seaweed and other sea vegetables contain beta-carotene, protein, vitamin B12, fiber, and chlorophyll, as well as chlorophylones - important fatty acids that may help in the fight against breast cancer. Also, many sea vegetables have high concentrations of the minerals potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, and iodine.

Diet tips: Sea vegetables come fresh, dried, or powdered. Both the Japanese & the Irish regularly use them as flavorings for broths & soups, stir-fried over rice, or as a wrap for fish and other seafood. Varieties such as dulce, wakame, Kombu, and hijiki even appear in pancakes, salads, puddings, and sandwiches.

TOFU

How it combats cancer: Soy contains several types of phytoestrogens -weak, nonsteroidal estrogens that could help prevent both breast and prostate cancer by blocking and suppressing cancerous changes. Genistein, one type of phytoestrogen, also lowers breast-cancer risk by inhibiting the growth of epithelial cells & new blood vessels that tumors require to flourish.

Diet tips: Tofu is made by coagulating the protein in soybeans - much the way cheese is produced. While bland on its own, tofu absorbs other flavors when cooked, making it perfect for stir-fries, dips, spreads, shakes, even cheesecake. It’s also a good high-protein substitute for meat, whole milk & mayonnaise.

ADDITIONAL NOTE:
Please note that ALL cruciferous vegetables (like cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, kale, brussel sprouts, etc.) CANNOT be taken raw as they contain oxalates, which if excessive, can lead to gall stones.
To get maximum benefit from these vegetables, please do not overcook them.


CAUSES OF CANCER

Not all cancers are the same. 1/3 is curable. 1/3 is preventable. 2 factors of cancer that cannot be controlled are AGE & FAMILY HISTORY.

Causes of cancer:
1. Smoking is very often the main cause of cancer. It kills us silently and drains money from us quietly. There're 4,000 harmful chemicals (though in diluted form) in one stick of cigarette. Taking one puff is 600 times worst than inhaling the exhaust fumes from vehicles.

2. Some food that cause cancer are:
2.1 Barbecued Food
2.2 Deep Fried Food
2.3 Overheating Meat
2.4 Food that is high in fat causes our bile to secrete acid that contains a chemical, which is a promoter of cancer cells.
2.5 Food that contains preservatives, too much salt or nitrates (e.g. Canned food, Salted egg & veggies, sausages, etc.)
2.6 Overnight Rice (where Aflatoxin is accumulated)
2.7 Food that is low in fiber: Our body needs 25 gm of both soluble & insoluble fiber daily. We must drink at least 1.5 liters of plain water a day.
2.8 Contaminated Food (e.g. molded bread causes our body to secrete toxins that may eventually lead to liver cancer in the long run. Never eat bread that is kept in room temperature for more than 2 days especially in a humid weather like Singapore's.

3. Specific Food & Beverages
4.1 Egg when eaten too much can cause High Colon Cancer. Risk Ovary Cancer, Prostate Cancer.
4.2 The residue of over-burned coffee is extremely bad for health. It can cause cancer.

#17 Ice101

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Posted 27 September 2005 - 08:57 PM

Is it true that tomato products (catsup) can help prevent cancer? ;)

#18 ala_ey

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Posted 03 October 2005 - 02:14 PM

Is it true that tomato products (catsup) can help prevent cancer?  ;)

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Studies conclude that a substance called lycopene found in tomato and tomate-related products helps prevent prostate cancer

#19 northampton

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Posted 03 October 2005 - 04:25 PM

The Toxins In Our Food Supply

How safe is the food we eat?

Our fish and seafood often contain pesticide residues, as do our fruits, vegetables, and grains. Among the foods that harbor the most bacteria, viruses, toxic metals, lead, pesticides, or aflatoxin, according to the authors of Safe Food: Eating in a Risky World, are: raw shellfish (oysters, mussels, clams), undercooked poultry and meat, raw milk, raw eggs and dishes containing raw eggs, certain large fish (like large salmon), overdone grilled fatty meats, food stored in lead-soldered cans, crystal or ceramics that leach lead, moldy peanuts and corn.

And then there are the suspected cancer-causing chemicals (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or PAHs and heterocyclic amines or HAs) in food. PAHs are produced when fatty foods are smoked or grilled. HAs are created mostly when meat, poultry, or fish is pan-fried or boiled until overdone (overcooking can be as unsafe as undercooking). Some fish contain toxins such as ciguatoxin while shellfish may contain toxins like paralytic shellfish toxin. Some foods, like comfrey tea and false morels (a type of wild mushroom), contain naturally occurring substances that could cause cancer. Other foods may develop toxins if they’re not stored properly.

What about raw fish? Sushi is sooo good and sushi lovers will be so delighted to know that the fish used for sushi very rarely harbor parasites. Like tuna (bluefin, yellowfin, etc.), Japanese yellowtail (young, hamachi), fish roe (other than herring roe), octopus, shrimp, scallops.

Eat, drink, but be wary, says author Dr. Michael Jacobson and co. When it comes to eating, it pays to be defensive. They share these tips to safer food:

Buy food fresh and store it properly. Observe expiration ("use by" or "sell by") dates on foods such as dairy products, eggs, meat, and poultry. Buy fish with bright, shiny flesh and skin. And keep food properly refrigerated. Assume that milk, eggs, cheese, fish, meat, and poultry are contaminated with harmful bacteria. Keeping these foods cold stops most types of bacteria from multiplying to possibly dangerous levels. Don’t leave these foods out for more than two hours. Thaw food overnight in your refrigerator, instead of at room temperature, which allows bacteria to thrive.

Handle and prepare food safely. Wash fruits and vegetables thoroughly. This can help remove some (though not all) of the pesticide residues, as well as harmful bacteria that might be present on the food. Remove outer leaves from leafy vegetables, and peel produce when appropriate.

Cook eggs, meat, fish, and poultry thoroughly to k*ll harmful bacteria that may be present. Use care with these foods to avoid cross-contamination or spreading bacteria to other foods. When handling raw eggs, meat, fish, and poultry, wash your hands, utensils, and kitchen surfaces with hot, soapy water.

Avoid foods that are mostly likely to contain natural toxins. Never eat moldy nuts and grains. Avoid comfrey and false morels. Cut out or throw away green or damaged spots on potatoes.

Happy and safe eating to all!

#20 shodandille

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Posted 16 October 2005 - 05:06 AM

im sorry to hear about your stories...

i lost both my grandmothers to cancer too. my grandma on my dad's side died before i was born so i never met her. but it was tragic anyways since my dad was only 11 when she died... and before she died, she was crying and telling my dad's older siblings to take care of my dad since he was the youngest and would have to grow up without her...

on the other hand, me and my other grandma were really, really close. we didn't know she had cancer until it was too late. she was just in the hospital for a check-up and then next thing we know, they had to take her in. the next day, she had multiple strokes and fell into a coma. that same day, we found out she was already in the latest stage of cancer.

everything happened so fast. after she was diagnosed with cancer, i would wake up in the middle of the night and sit for minutes wishing everything was just a dream. it was crazy and i remembered that my eyes were swollen from crying every time i thought about it -- which was pretty much all the time. 3 weeks after falling into her coma and after being diagnosed with cancer, she passed away.

the lesson i learned from that was simple: never let a day go by without telling people how u feel about them. i regret not ever telling my grandma how much i loved her. when i told her, she was already in a coma and i don't know if she ever heard me...

to this day, it still bugs me that she never heard me say i love u. i sometimes dream about her and in my dreams, i usually run to hug her and i start crying and try to mumble the words "i love you". she usually doesnt say anything in my dreams but one time, she did say something: "i know you do, don't cry. i never got the chance to tell u either but i hope u know i love u..."


my dreams sound like movies.. i've had quite a few but they're all real and very touching for me...

cancer took away my grandma's life but not her love. if u lose someone to cancer, i hope you'll see it this way too.




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